Start Date

15-10-2009 12:00 PM

End Date

15-10-2009 12:15 PM

Description

Objective: This study estimates the productivity losses from different chronic disorders (e.g., heart conditions, diabetes, cancer) and some measures of risk factors (smoking, drinking) in two period of time, 1994 and 2005, among Canadian labour force.

Methods: Using the data from the National Population Health Survey 1994 and Canadian Community Health Survey2005, the probability of having disability days, number of disability days, and income losses have been estimated and compared in years 1994 and 2005. In each year, a two-part model is used to estimate the impact of DM and other chronic disorders on labour market outcomes. Part one uses logistic regression to estimate the impact of risk factors and chronic diseases on the probability of having any disability day; part two uses log-transformed OLS regression with smearing correction to estimate the impact of each risk factor and chronic disorder on number of the disability days.

Results: Over the past decade, the prevalence of most of the chronic disorders (e.g., diabetes, Depression, and obesity) have been increased. However, the prevalence of smoking has been decreased, and the number of regular drinkers and physical exercise has been increased. The overall trend of disability days has been increased insignificantly, for women and men.

Conclusions: The results are of use to policy makers and health service researchers interested in identifying and quantifying chronic-related productivity losses using econometric modeling.

Farah Farahati received her PhD. in applied microeconomics from the Department of Economics, Northern Illinois University in May 2001. Following the completion of her doctoral studies, she has worked and collaborated in many academic and governmental agencies projects, such as Centers for Mental Health care Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, the Center for Program for Assessment of Technology and Health (PATH), McMaster University, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) and most recently at the Toronto Health Economics Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and Walkereconomics, inc. Farah's work experience includes applying econometric analysis and outcomes research methodologies to the health care services issues such as decision analytic modeling, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget impact, direct and indirect burden of illness studies.

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Oct 15th, 12:00 PM Oct 15th, 12:15 PM

Poster Introductions I--Productivity Losses of Chronic Diseases Among Canadian Labour Force from 1994 to 2005: Estimate from the Nationally Representative Samples

Objective: This study estimates the productivity losses from different chronic disorders (e.g., heart conditions, diabetes, cancer) and some measures of risk factors (smoking, drinking) in two period of time, 1994 and 2005, among Canadian labour force.

Methods: Using the data from the National Population Health Survey 1994 and Canadian Community Health Survey2005, the probability of having disability days, number of disability days, and income losses have been estimated and compared in years 1994 and 2005. In each year, a two-part model is used to estimate the impact of DM and other chronic disorders on labour market outcomes. Part one uses logistic regression to estimate the impact of risk factors and chronic diseases on the probability of having any disability day; part two uses log-transformed OLS regression with smearing correction to estimate the impact of each risk factor and chronic disorder on number of the disability days.

Results: Over the past decade, the prevalence of most of the chronic disorders (e.g., diabetes, Depression, and obesity) have been increased. However, the prevalence of smoking has been decreased, and the number of regular drinkers and physical exercise has been increased. The overall trend of disability days has been increased insignificantly, for women and men.

Conclusions: The results are of use to policy makers and health service researchers interested in identifying and quantifying chronic-related productivity losses using econometric modeling.

Farah Farahati received her PhD. in applied microeconomics from the Department of Economics, Northern Illinois University in May 2001. Following the completion of her doctoral studies, she has worked and collaborated in many academic and governmental agencies projects, such as Centers for Mental Health care Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, the Center for Program for Assessment of Technology and Health (PATH), McMaster University, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) and most recently at the Toronto Health Economics Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and Walkereconomics, inc. Farah's work experience includes applying econometric analysis and outcomes research methodologies to the health care services issues such as decision analytic modeling, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget impact, direct and indirect burden of illness studies.