Start Date

15-10-2009 12:00 PM

End Date

15-10-2009 12:15 PM

Description

Research on the social determinants of health and health inequalities has drawn increasingly from the comparative social policy literature. Much of this research relies on one welfare regime typology, but there is a need to systematically review the efficacy of this and alternative approaches if we are to advance research in this area and provide state-of-the-art information to policy makers. Our paper presents the findings of a critical review of the public health literature on socioeconomic inequalities in health and the welfare state. In addition to synthesizing existing research, we identify knowledge gaps, and address the research and policy implications of existing work.

Sarah Brennenstuhl is a 2nd year Ph.D. student at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Sarah's general research interests are the structural determinants of women's health. For her dissertation work, Sarah plans to looks at how the structural changes associated with the dominant political ideology of neo-liberalism have impacted uniquely on women's health in Canada.

Peggy McDonough is an Associate Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Her research interests in social inequalities in health and women’s health have led her recently to incorporate a comparative welfare state dimension in her studies.

Amélie Quesnel-Vallée, PhD, is Assistant Professor at McGill University, where she holds an Arts and Medicine cross-faculty appointment in the Departments of Sociology and of Epidemiology. She also heads the International Research Infrastructure on Social inequalities in health (IRIS), funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation Leaders Opportunity Fund. In 2005, she received the American Sociological Association Dissertation Award for her Fulbright-funded doctoral research. She currently studies the impact of public policies on health inequalities in 21 OECD countries. Her work recently appeared in a book she co-edited, Le privé dans la santé : Les discours et les faits (Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 2008.


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Oct 15th, 12:00 PM Oct 15th, 12:15 PM

Poster Introductions I--Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health and the Welfare State: A Research Synthesis

Research on the social determinants of health and health inequalities has drawn increasingly from the comparative social policy literature. Much of this research relies on one welfare regime typology, but there is a need to systematically review the efficacy of this and alternative approaches if we are to advance research in this area and provide state-of-the-art information to policy makers. Our paper presents the findings of a critical review of the public health literature on socioeconomic inequalities in health and the welfare state. In addition to synthesizing existing research, we identify knowledge gaps, and address the research and policy implications of existing work.

Sarah Brennenstuhl is a 2nd year Ph.D. student at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Sarah's general research interests are the structural determinants of women's health. For her dissertation work, Sarah plans to looks at how the structural changes associated with the dominant political ideology of neo-liberalism have impacted uniquely on women's health in Canada.

Peggy McDonough is an Associate Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Her research interests in social inequalities in health and women’s health have led her recently to incorporate a comparative welfare state dimension in her studies.

Amélie Quesnel-Vallée, PhD, is Assistant Professor at McGill University, where she holds an Arts and Medicine cross-faculty appointment in the Departments of Sociology and of Epidemiology. She also heads the International Research Infrastructure on Social inequalities in health (IRIS), funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation Leaders Opportunity Fund. In 2005, she received the American Sociological Association Dissertation Award for her Fulbright-funded doctoral research. She currently studies the impact of public policies on health inequalities in 21 OECD countries. Her work recently appeared in a book she co-edited, Le privé dans la santé : Les discours et les faits (Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 2008.