Bone and Joint Institute

Title

Polyethylene glenoid component fixation geometry influences stability in total shoulder arthroplasty

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-17-2019

Journal

Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering

Volume

22

Issue

3

First Page

271

Last Page

279

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1080/10255842.2018.1551526

Abstract

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Glenoid component stability is essential to ensure successful long-term survivability following total shoulder arthroplasty. As such, this computational study assessed the stability of five all-polyethylene glenoid components (Keel, Central-Finned 4-Peg, Peripheral 4-Peg, Cross-Keel, and Inverted-Y), using simulated joint loading in an osteoarthritic patient cohort. Stability was assessed on the basis of component micromotion in the tangential and normal directions. Maximum tangential micromotion occurred in the Cross-Keel (146 ± 46 µm), which was significantly greater (p <.001) than the other components. Maximum normal micromotion occurred in the Inverted-Y (109 ± 43 µm), which was significantly greater (p ≤.002) than the other four components. In general, the Central-Finned 4-Peg exhibited the least normal and tangential micromotion, while the keeled components shown the highest normal and tangential micromotion. This study suggests that modifications to keeled designs do not improve component stability under the conditions tested, and pegged components show superior computational stability.

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