Session Type

Presentation

Room

PAB 106

Start Date

10-7-2013 11:15 AM

Keywords

flipped classroom, active learning, online instruction, student engagement

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

In a traditionally run university science course, the instructor imparts information to students during lectures, and students work on problems outside of class to solidify this knowledge. “Flipping the classroom” refers to the practice of having students acquire information before class, for example from a recorded lecture, and using class time to work interactively with their peers and the instructor on homework-style problems or exercises. In principle, the flipped classroom makes better use of the contact time between instructor and students, because the instructor can provide timely guidance tailored to individual student difficulties.

I tried the flipped classroom strategy in a third-year Biochemistry course with an enrolment of 180 students. In this presentation I will describe how I implemented the strategy using recorded lectures and online assignments coupled with in-class exercises done by students in small groups. Most in-class activities were problems based on experiments published in the scientific literature, although some featured tactile manipulation of objects to illustrate biochemical concepts. Those attending the session will participate in an example of the latter type of exercise, relating to DNA structure. The main lessons I learned from my first attempt to flip the classroom are that running some types of exercises with 150+ students is logistically demanding, and that it is easy to make in-class problems too difficult. I will place my experiences into the context of published work about classroom flipping. Time will be allotted for attendees to share their insights and ideas about strategies for flipping the classroom.

Media Format

flash_audio


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Jul 10th, 11:15 AM

Less time talking at students and more time talking with them: experiences of a neophyte classroom flipper

PAB 106

In a traditionally run university science course, the instructor imparts information to students during lectures, and students work on problems outside of class to solidify this knowledge. “Flipping the classroom” refers to the practice of having students acquire information before class, for example from a recorded lecture, and using class time to work interactively with their peers and the instructor on homework-style problems or exercises. In principle, the flipped classroom makes better use of the contact time between instructor and students, because the instructor can provide timely guidance tailored to individual student difficulties.

I tried the flipped classroom strategy in a third-year Biochemistry course with an enrolment of 180 students. In this presentation I will describe how I implemented the strategy using recorded lectures and online assignments coupled with in-class exercises done by students in small groups. Most in-class activities were problems based on experiments published in the scientific literature, although some featured tactile manipulation of objects to illustrate biochemical concepts. Those attending the session will participate in an example of the latter type of exercise, relating to DNA structure. The main lessons I learned from my first attempt to flip the classroom are that running some types of exercises with 150+ students is logistically demanding, and that it is easy to make in-class problems too difficult. I will place my experiences into the context of published work about classroom flipping. Time will be allotted for attendees to share their insights and ideas about strategies for flipping the classroom.