Proposal Title

Thriving in post-secondary Science education: Supporting your students’ academic well-being

Session Type

Workshop

Room

P&A Rm 117

Start Date

July 2015

Keywords

students, academic well-being, positive student development, positive psychology, flourishing, thriving

Primary Threads

None of the Above

Abstract

Although traditional conceptualizations of student success have focused on retention and grades, more recent perspectives have taken a more holistic approach that considers students’ success in terms of their well-being, including their well-being in the classroom. Research suggests that increases in students’ academic well-being can result in improved learning and, potentially, increased life satisfaction (Oades, Robinson, Green, & Spence, 2011; Schreiner, 2013; Seligman, 2011). Drawing on principles from Positive Psychology, “the scientific study of optimal human functioning” (Alex Linley, Joseph, Harrington, & Wood, 2006, p. 8), and research on student learning, we will gather in this interactive workshop to work together to create concrete strategies for how we can support our students in improving their academic well-being and help them thrive in our courses. Specifically, we will work in small groups to examine how we, as Science teachers, can develop learning experiences that support five aspects of our students’ academic well-being; positive emotions, engagement, positive relationships, meaning, and sense of accomplishment. Together we will then discuss the advantages and challenges of implementing these strategies in our Science courses. Promoting our students’ thriving in these areas should, ultimately, lead to deeper learning.

Alex Linley, P., Joseph, S., Harrington, S., & Wood, A. M. (2006). Positive psychology: Past, present, and (possible) future. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1(1), 3-16

Oades, L. G., Robinson, P., Green, S., & Spence, G. B. (2011). Towards a positive university. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 6(6), 432-439.

Schreiner, L. A. (2013). Thriving in college. New Directions for Student Services, 143, 41-52.

Seligman, M. E. (2011). Flourish: A visionary new understanding of happiness and well-being. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Elements of Engagement

Participants will work in small groups (3-5 people) to generate concrete strategies for how they can support their students academic well-being and help them thrive in their courses. The small groups will present their conclusions to the session participants and the participants will discuss the advantages and challenges of implementing these strategies in their courses.

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Jul 8th, 3:45 PM

Thriving in post-secondary Science education: Supporting your students’ academic well-being

P&A Rm 117

Although traditional conceptualizations of student success have focused on retention and grades, more recent perspectives have taken a more holistic approach that considers students’ success in terms of their well-being, including their well-being in the classroom. Research suggests that increases in students’ academic well-being can result in improved learning and, potentially, increased life satisfaction (Oades, Robinson, Green, & Spence, 2011; Schreiner, 2013; Seligman, 2011). Drawing on principles from Positive Psychology, “the scientific study of optimal human functioning” (Alex Linley, Joseph, Harrington, & Wood, 2006, p. 8), and research on student learning, we will gather in this interactive workshop to work together to create concrete strategies for how we can support our students in improving their academic well-being and help them thrive in our courses. Specifically, we will work in small groups to examine how we, as Science teachers, can develop learning experiences that support five aspects of our students’ academic well-being; positive emotions, engagement, positive relationships, meaning, and sense of accomplishment. Together we will then discuss the advantages and challenges of implementing these strategies in our Science courses. Promoting our students’ thriving in these areas should, ultimately, lead to deeper learning.

Alex Linley, P., Joseph, S., Harrington, S., & Wood, A. M. (2006). Positive psychology: Past, present, and (possible) future. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1(1), 3-16

Oades, L. G., Robinson, P., Green, S., & Spence, G. B. (2011). Towards a positive university. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 6(6), 432-439.

Schreiner, L. A. (2013). Thriving in college. New Directions for Student Services, 143, 41-52.

Seligman, M. E. (2011). Flourish: A visionary new understanding of happiness and well-being. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.