Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Green roofs, also referred to as vegetated roofs, have increased in popularity in recent years in North America. Traditionally their use had been more prominent in European countries, such as Germany, however the North American design community have recently adopted them, thanks in part to programs such as LEED and the City of Toronto’s Green Roof Bylaw. Toronto’s Green Roof Bylaw mandates “green roofs on new commercial, institutional and residential development with a minimum Gross Floor Area of 2,000m2 as of January 31, 2010”. Also contained within the aforementioned Green Roof Bylaw is a requirement that the submitted green roof design explicitly state the uplift wind pressures that it has been designed for, and how the design addresses the stated pressures. This report needs to be stamped by a Professional Engineer.

This requirement has led to many questions regarding the wind resistance of a green roof, which is a unique building material in many ways - it is organic, living, porous, and has a variable weight (based on the amount of water it is retaining). Conventional building materials have strict tolerances and highly standardized, whereas the properties of green roofs change on a daily basis.

The intent of this paper is to discuss the design of a green roof in order to prevent lift off/fly away of a green roof assembly. The methods presented are based on applicable standards and building codes, as well as specific testing that has been undertaken on a green roof system to demonstrate its porosity and pressure equalization properties.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-556: WIND UPLIFT RESISTANCE DESIGN OF A GREEN ROOF

London

Green roofs, also referred to as vegetated roofs, have increased in popularity in recent years in North America. Traditionally their use had been more prominent in European countries, such as Germany, however the North American design community have recently adopted them, thanks in part to programs such as LEED and the City of Toronto’s Green Roof Bylaw. Toronto’s Green Roof Bylaw mandates “green roofs on new commercial, institutional and residential development with a minimum Gross Floor Area of 2,000m2 as of January 31, 2010”. Also contained within the aforementioned Green Roof Bylaw is a requirement that the submitted green roof design explicitly state the uplift wind pressures that it has been designed for, and how the design addresses the stated pressures. This report needs to be stamped by a Professional Engineer.

This requirement has led to many questions regarding the wind resistance of a green roof, which is a unique building material in many ways - it is organic, living, porous, and has a variable weight (based on the amount of water it is retaining). Conventional building materials have strict tolerances and highly standardized, whereas the properties of green roofs change on a daily basis.

The intent of this paper is to discuss the design of a green roof in order to prevent lift off/fly away of a green roof assembly. The methods presented are based on applicable standards and building codes, as well as specific testing that has been undertaken on a green roof system to demonstrate its porosity and pressure equalization properties.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/37