Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Wind speeds can be difficult to measure during tornadoes due to their destructive nature. They pose a significant threat to lives and infrastructure in many parts of Canada and the U.S. The Enhanced-Fujita scale focuses on estimating these wind speeds by observing damage to different types of buildings, but significantly less research has been performed on the damage of other structures. Learning more about the effects of high wind speeds on these structures will help improve the ease and accuracy of future tornado classification. A wind tunnel study was performed at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory of Western University. The study focusses on estimating the wind speeds that cause overturning in a standard 32” concrete “Jersey” barrier. On April 27, 2014, an EF4 Tornado struck Mayflower, Arkansas, and among the damage, several of these concrete barriers were blown over during the storm. The goal of this study was to find the overturning wind velocity and compare it to other damage in this event. This study was performed by placing a 1:8 scale-model of these barriers in a wind tunnel at a variety of orientations and wind speeds. Through analysis, it was determined that an instantaneous wind velocity of 4.55 to 4.85 m/s would cause overturning. These values correspond to an instantaneous wind speed of 340-360 km/h at full scale. It was estimated that the 3-second gust (used for EF rating) was 300-320 km/h, which sits at the top of the 267-322 km/h classification range for an EF4 tornado.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-525: EFFECTS OF TORNADO WIND SPEEDS ON CONCRETE ROAD BARRIERS

London

Wind speeds can be difficult to measure during tornadoes due to their destructive nature. They pose a significant threat to lives and infrastructure in many parts of Canada and the U.S. The Enhanced-Fujita scale focuses on estimating these wind speeds by observing damage to different types of buildings, but significantly less research has been performed on the damage of other structures. Learning more about the effects of high wind speeds on these structures will help improve the ease and accuracy of future tornado classification. A wind tunnel study was performed at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory of Western University. The study focusses on estimating the wind speeds that cause overturning in a standard 32” concrete “Jersey” barrier. On April 27, 2014, an EF4 Tornado struck Mayflower, Arkansas, and among the damage, several of these concrete barriers were blown over during the storm. The goal of this study was to find the overturning wind velocity and compare it to other damage in this event. This study was performed by placing a 1:8 scale-model of these barriers in a wind tunnel at a variety of orientations and wind speeds. Through analysis, it was determined that an instantaneous wind velocity of 4.55 to 4.85 m/s would cause overturning. These values correspond to an instantaneous wind speed of 340-360 km/h at full scale. It was estimated that the 3-second gust (used for EF rating) was 300-320 km/h, which sits at the top of the 267-322 km/h classification range for an EF4 tornado.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/18