Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Wind induced damage on low-rise buildings with complex roof geometry is common in coastal areas of USA, such as Florida and Louisiana. Available design codes provide information about the design of regular roof geometries (e.g. hip/gable roofs), but refer to wind tunnel modelling for complex roof geometries. Due to time and financial constraints physical modelling may not always be possible to carry out. Computational modelling through Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has been used successfully for several wind engineering applications. This paper presents comparisons between LES and previously obtained wind tunnel data of mean and peak pressure coefficients on a low rise building with complex roof geometry. Two different cases, namely: isolated building and the effect of neighbouring buildings have been considered for the most critical wind direction of 135 degrees. Results show that the mean pressure coefficients on the low rise building roof for the case with adjacent buildings were somewhat lower in magnitude (less suction) than the isolated case. In general, excellent matching was obtained within a factor of 1.1 between wind tunnel and LES for all roof locations except at the roof ridge, where the latter predicted somewhat lower mean and peak pressure coefficient values than wind tunnel data. The velocity streamlines obtained from LES provide an excellent overview of the airflow around the buildings. This study shows the efficacy of LES for assessing wind loads on building roofs with complex geometry, since existing codes do not provide any quantitative assessment methods for such problems.


Share

COinS
 
Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-514: LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF WIND INDUCED LOADS ON A LOW RISE BUILDING WITH COMPLEX ROOF GEOMETRY

London

Wind induced damage on low-rise buildings with complex roof geometry is common in coastal areas of USA, such as Florida and Louisiana. Available design codes provide information about the design of regular roof geometries (e.g. hip/gable roofs), but refer to wind tunnel modelling for complex roof geometries. Due to time and financial constraints physical modelling may not always be possible to carry out. Computational modelling through Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has been used successfully for several wind engineering applications. This paper presents comparisons between LES and previously obtained wind tunnel data of mean and peak pressure coefficients on a low rise building with complex roof geometry. Two different cases, namely: isolated building and the effect of neighbouring buildings have been considered for the most critical wind direction of 135 degrees. Results show that the mean pressure coefficients on the low rise building roof for the case with adjacent buildings were somewhat lower in magnitude (less suction) than the isolated case. In general, excellent matching was obtained within a factor of 1.1 between wind tunnel and LES for all roof locations except at the roof ridge, where the latter predicted somewhat lower mean and peak pressure coefficient values than wind tunnel data. The velocity streamlines obtained from LES provide an excellent overview of the airflow around the buildings. This study shows the efficacy of LES for assessing wind loads on building roofs with complex geometry, since existing codes do not provide any quantitative assessment methods for such problems.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/10