Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Debris impact on structures have been reported and shown to be a major reason for structural failure in many post-mortem site assessments of tsunami devastated communities. However, due to the random nature of the debris motion, determining areas at-risk for debris impact is difficult. This paper presents a novel camera-based object tracking algorithm which allows for the quick and accurate tracking of debris trajectory in highly turbulent flows. The algorithm was used to determine debris motion observed during an experimental program on the displacement of scaled-down shipping containers (debris), carried out by the authors in the Tsunami Wave Basin at Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. This study evaluated the effect of the initial orientation and number of debris on the time histories of their trajectory, orientation and velocity. The study found that, while random in nature, the motion of the debris was highly repeatable through the various tests conducted. An increase in the number of debris resulted in a higher peak debris velocity. Setting the initial orientation of the long-axis of the debris perpendicular to the flow direction resulted in an earlier and higher peak velocity than in the case of the debris initially oriented parallel to the direction of the flow.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-500: OPTICAL TRACKING OF DEBRIS IN EXTREME HYDRODYNAMIC CONDITIONS

London

Debris impact on structures have been reported and shown to be a major reason for structural failure in many post-mortem site assessments of tsunami devastated communities. However, due to the random nature of the debris motion, determining areas at-risk for debris impact is difficult. This paper presents a novel camera-based object tracking algorithm which allows for the quick and accurate tracking of debris trajectory in highly turbulent flows. The algorithm was used to determine debris motion observed during an experimental program on the displacement of scaled-down shipping containers (debris), carried out by the authors in the Tsunami Wave Basin at Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. This study evaluated the effect of the initial orientation and number of debris on the time histories of their trajectory, orientation and velocity. The study found that, while random in nature, the motion of the debris was highly repeatable through the various tests conducted. An increase in the number of debris resulted in a higher peak debris velocity. Setting the initial orientation of the long-axis of the debris perpendicular to the flow direction resulted in an earlier and higher peak velocity than in the case of the debris initially oriented parallel to the direction of the flow.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/1