Location

Victoria South Ballroom, Ottawa Marriott Hotel

Event Website

http://sociology.uwo.ca/cluster/en/projects/knowledge_mobilization/2015/2015_conference/index.html#2015 Conference

Start Date

19-3-2015 5:00 PM

End Date

19-3-2015 5:15 PM

Description

Poster Presentation

This poster presents the results of a records linkage project to analyze potential mortality risks for young adults in Ontario during the 1918 influenza epidemic. With a team of research assistants at Western University, McMaster University, and the Université de Montréal, death records were linked to birth records in order to determine exact date of birth for the calculation of exact age at death. This date of birth is then compared to age as listed on other historical documents, such as the 1901 and 1911 Canadian censuses. The family environment (or living situation) was transcribed for each individual at each census to examine the impact of socioeconomic conditions throughout the lifecourse on mortality in 1918.

Of the 23,183 deaths registered in Ontario between September and December 1918 and transcribed by the International Infectious Disease Data Archive at McMaster University, 3,316 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Both birth and death must have occurred in Ontario to establish exact date of birth and the individual must have died between the ages of 23 and 35 (born between 1883 and 1895). Of the 3,316 included death records, 2,965 were linked to at least one other record, giving a linkage success rate of 89.4%. This poster analyzes the linkage rates of the death records to birth records from 1883-1895 and the 1901 and 1911 Canadian censuses and uses logistic regression to investigate the important factors that precluded linkage. It evaluates declared age at all three time periods to discuss the suitability of these records for historical demographic analyses of past epidemic disease.


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Mar 19th, 5:00 PM Mar 19th, 5:15 PM

Probabilistic Records Linkage using Historical Canadian Censuses and Vital Statistics

Victoria South Ballroom, Ottawa Marriott Hotel

Poster Presentation

This poster presents the results of a records linkage project to analyze potential mortality risks for young adults in Ontario during the 1918 influenza epidemic. With a team of research assistants at Western University, McMaster University, and the Université de Montréal, death records were linked to birth records in order to determine exact date of birth for the calculation of exact age at death. This date of birth is then compared to age as listed on other historical documents, such as the 1901 and 1911 Canadian censuses. The family environment (or living situation) was transcribed for each individual at each census to examine the impact of socioeconomic conditions throughout the lifecourse on mortality in 1918.

Of the 23,183 deaths registered in Ontario between September and December 1918 and transcribed by the International Infectious Disease Data Archive at McMaster University, 3,316 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Both birth and death must have occurred in Ontario to establish exact date of birth and the individual must have died between the ages of 23 and 35 (born between 1883 and 1895). Of the 3,316 included death records, 2,965 were linked to at least one other record, giving a linkage success rate of 89.4%. This poster analyzes the linkage rates of the death records to birth records from 1883-1895 and the 1901 and 1911 Canadian censuses and uses logistic regression to investigate the important factors that precluded linkage. It evaluates declared age at all three time periods to discuss the suitability of these records for historical demographic analyses of past epidemic disease.

https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/pclc_conf/2015/Day1/36

 

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