Title

An Open Resource for Non-human Primate Imaging

Authors

Michael P. Milham, Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY 10022, USA; Center for Biomedical Imaging and Neuromodulation, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY 10962, USA. Electronic address: michael.milham@childmind.org.
Lei Ai, Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY 10022, USA.
Bonhwang Koo, Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY 10022, USA.
Ting Xu, Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY 10022, USA.
Céline Amiez, University of Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, INSERM, Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute U1208, Lyon, France.
Fabien Balezeau, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK.
Mark G. Baxter, Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
Erwin L. Blezer, Biomedical MR Imaging and Spectroscopy Group, Center for Image Sciences, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Thomas Brochier, Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, CNRS & Aix-Marseille Université, UMR 7289, Marseille, France.
Aihua Chen, Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics (Ministry of Education & Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality), School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China.
Paula L. Croxson, Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
Christienne G. Damatac, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 EN Nijmegen, Netherlands.
Stanislas Dehaene, NeuroSpin, CEA, INSERM U992, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
Stefan Everling, Centre for Functional and Metabolic Mapping, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada.
Damian A. Fair, Department of Behavior Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
Lazar Fleysher, Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
Winrich Freiwald, Laboratory of Neural Systems, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA.
Sean Froudist-Walsh, Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY 10023, USA.
Timothy D. Griffiths, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK.
Carole Guedj, INSERM, U1028, CNRS UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Lyon, France.
Fadila Hadj-Bouziane, INSERM, U1028, CNRS UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Lyon, France.
Suliann Ben Hamed, Institut des Sciences Cognitives - Marc Jeannerod, UMR5229, CNRS-Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
Noam Harel, Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
Bassem Hiba, Institut des Sciences Cognitives - Marc Jeannerod, UMR5229, CNRS-Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
Bechir Jarraya, NeuroSpin, CEA, INSERM U992, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
Benjamin Jung, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Sabine Kastner, Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA.
P Christiaan Klink, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1105 BA Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Sze Chai Kwok, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics (Ministry of Education), East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China; NYU-ECNU Institute of Brain and Cognitive Science at NYU Shanghai, Shanghai 200062, China.
Kevin N. Laland, Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK.
David A. Leopold, Section on Cognitive Neurophysiology and Imaging, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; Neurophysiology Imaging Facility, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Patrik Lindenfors, Institute for Future Studies, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Cultural Evolution & Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-10-2018

Journal

Neuron

Volume

100

Issue

1

First Page

61

Last Page

74.e2

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1016/j.neuron.2018.08.039

Abstract

Non-human primate neuroimaging is a rapidly growing area of research that promises to transform and scale translational and cross-species comparative neuroscience. Unfortunately, the technological and methodological advances of the past two decades have outpaced the accrual of data, which is particularly challenging given the relatively few centers that have the necessary facilities and capabilities. The PRIMatE Data Exchange (PRIME-DE) addresses this challenge by aggregating independently acquired non-human primate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets and openly sharing them via the International Neuroimaging Data-sharing Initiative (INDI). Here, we present the rationale, design, and procedures for the PRIME-DE consortium, as well as the initial release, consisting of 25 independent data collections aggregated across 22 sites (total = 217 non-human primates). We also outline the unique pitfalls and challenges that should be considered in the analysis of non-human primate MRI datasets, including providing automated quality assessment of the contributed datasets.

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