Bone and Joint Institute

Title

Clinical impact of trunnion wear after total hip arthroplasty

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2016

Journal

JBJS Reviews

Volume

4

Issue

8

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.2106/JBJS.RVW.15.00096

Abstract

© 2016 by the journal of bone and joint surgery, incorporated. Trunnionosis, characterized by corrosion and fretting of the taper, is a well-known entity commonly demonstrated in retrieval specimens. While there have been a number of recent reports regarding the potential for adverse local tissue reactions related to trunnionosis, it remains a relatively infrequent cause for failure of total hip replacement implants. A number of factors, including both biomechanical and bioelectrochemical factors, have a known impact on the development and severity of trunnionosis. Furthermore, specific implant design and material-related factors have been shown to influence the risk of trunnionosis leading to adverse local tissue reactions. Retention of a well-fixed femoral stem, in spite of corrosion of the male taper junction, is acceptable in the majority of cases. A ceramic head, often in combination with a titanium adaptor sleeve, is the most common replacement reported in the current literature to treat trunnionosis. In patients with modular-neck total hip replacements, revision of the femoral stem is likely required if corrosion at the modular neck-stem junction is encountered.

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