Bone and Joint Institute

Title

Appropriate Osteoporosis Treatment by Family Physicians inResponse to FRAX vs CAROC Reporting: Results Froma Randomized Controlled Trial

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2014

Journal

Journal of Clinical Densitometry

Volume

17

Issue

4

First Page

458

Last Page

465

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1016/j.jocd.2013.09.007

Abstract

© 2014 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Canadian guidelines recommend either the FRAX or the Canadian Association of Radiologists and Osteoporosis Canada (CAROC) fracture risk assessment tools to report 10-yr fracture risk as low (<10%), moderate (10%-20%) or high (>20%). It is unknown whether one reporting system is more effective in helping family physicians (FPs) identify individuals who require treatment. Individuals ≥50yr old with a distal radius fracture and no previous osteoporosis diagnosis or treatment were recruited. Participants underwent a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and answered questions about fracture risk factors. Participants' FPs were randomized to receive either a FRAX report or the standard CAROC-derived bone mineral density report currently used by the institution. Only the FRAX report included statements regarding treatment recommendations. Within 3 mo, all participants were asked about follow-up care by their FP, and treatment recommendations were compared with anosteoporosis specialist. Sixty participants were enrolled (31 to FRAX and 29 to CAROC). Kappa statistics of agreement in treatment recommendation were 0.64 for FRAX and 0.32 for bone mineral density. The FRAX report was preferred by FPs and resulted in better postfracture follow-up and treatment that agreed more closely with a specialist. Either the clear statement of fracture risk or the specific statement of treatment recommendations on the FRAX report may have supported FPs to make better treatment decisions.

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