Bone and Joint Institute

Title

Revision shoulder arthroplasty: a systematic review and comparison of North American vs. European outcomes and complications

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2020

Journal

Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Volume

29

Issue

5

First Page

1071

Last Page

1082

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1016/j.jse.2019.12.015

Abstract

© 2019 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees Background: Joint registries provide invaluable data on primary arthroplasties with revision as the endpoint; however, the revision outcomes are often excluded. Therefore, a PROSPERO registered review (CRD42015032531) of all revision studies in North America and Europe was conducted to evaluate demographics, etiologies and indications, implant manufacturer, and complications by geographic region. Methods: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases were searched for revision arthroplasty clinical studies with a minimum mean 24-month follow-up. There were no language exclusions. Articles published in German, French, and Italian were reviewed by research personnel proficient in each language. Results: The mean age at revision was 66 ± 5 years (male = 759, female = 1123). The male-female ratio in North American and Europeans studies was 43:57 and 34:66, respectively. The most common etiology for primary surgery in both regions was osteoarthritis or glenoid arthrosis (38%). The most common revision indication overall was rotator cuff tear, deficiency, or arthropathy (26%). The most common implant type used in revisions was a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (54%). The complication rate for all revisions was 17%. There were a total of 465 complications, and of those, 74% lead to a reoperation. Conclusion: Generally, shoulder arthroplasties are designed to last 10-15 years; however, revisions are being performed at a mean 3.9 years from the primary procedure, based on the published studies included in this systematic review. Additionally, of the complications, a large number (74%) went on to a reoperation. Further insight into the reasons for early revisions and standardized reporting metrics and data collection on revisions is needed.

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