Bone and Joint Institute

Title

INternational ORthopaedic MUlticentre Study (INORMUS) in Fracture Care: Protocol for a large prospective observational study

Authors

Mohit Bhandari, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences
P. J. Devereaux, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences
Rebecca Q. Ivers, The University of Sydney
Theodore Miclau, University of California, San Francisco
Paul Moroz, University of Ottawa, Canada
Lehana Thabane, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences
Sheila Sprague, McMaster University
Paula McKay, McMaster University
Chuan Silvia Li, McMaster University
Jagnoor Jagnoor, George Institute for Global Health
Gerard Slobogean, University of Maryland
Respicious Boniface, Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute
Bruce Browner, Duke University
Fernando De La Huerta, Mexican Institute for Social Security
Andrew Pollak, University of Maryland
Brad Petrisor, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences
Parag Sancheti, Sancheti Institute for Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation
Emil Schemitsch, University of Toronto
Junlin Zhou, Capital Medical University
Gordon Guyatt, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences
Raman Mundi, McMaster University
Nathan O'Hara, McMaster University
Diane Heels-Ansdell, McMaster University
Lisa Buckingham, McMaster University
Nicole Simunovic, McMaster University
Robyn Norton, George Institute for Global Health
Jing Zhang, George Institute for Global Health
Maoyi Tian, George Institute for Global Health
Lalit Yadav, George Institute for Global Health
Amber Caldwell, University of California, San Francisco
Saam Morshed, University of California, San Francisco
Yang Liu, Capital Medical University
Qiushi Wang, Capital Medical University

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-1-2015

Journal

Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma

Volume

29

First Page

S2

Last Page

S6

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1097/BOT.0000000000000404

Abstract

Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Despite the fact that orthopaedic trauma injuries represent a serious cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, there are few data in low-middle income countries quantifying the burden of fractures and describing current treatment practices. To address this critical knowledge gap, a large multinational prospective observational study of 40,000 patients with musculoskeletal trauma in Africa, Asia, and Latin America is proposed. The International Orthopaedic Multicentre Study in Fracture Care (INORMUS) study seeks to determine the incidence of major complications (mortality, reoperation, and infection) within 30 days after a musculoskeletal injury and to determine patient, treatment, and system factors associated with these major complications in low-middle income countries. This study coincides with the World Health Organization's Global Road Traffic Safety Decade (2011-2020) and other international efforts to reduce the burden of injury on developing populations. Insight gained from the INORMUS study will not only inform the global burden of orthopaedic trauma but also drive the development of future randomized trials to evaluate simple solutions and practical interventions to decrease deaths and improve the quality of life for trauma patients worldwide.

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