Start Date

28-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2011 8:30 PM

Description

Abstract: Cultural brokering refers to a process where individuals mediate between two parties that are experiencing some type of cultural misunderstanding. Our exploratory study indicates that cultural brokering is a diverse experience that spans the boundaries of one’s family and includes various norms, values and traditions.

Comments

Summary: Developmental psychologists working in the field of acculturation have focused their research on the phenomenon of language brokering, where children of immigrants are called upon to assist their parents in situations requiring some degree of mastery of the English language. Brokering can extend beyond knowledge of a language and include knowledge of the underlying norms and culture of the mainstream society. This exploratory study focused on the cultural brokering
experiences of 40 bicultural young adults (27 female), first or second generation immigrants to Canada. The first part of the study used in-depth interviews to look at the most significant cultural brokering experiences reported by the participants. The second part of the study used a number of measures that aimed at quantifying the cultural brokering experiences and how these relate to various aspects of bicultural identity and acculturation.

Qualitative data showed that cultural brokering occurs in a variety of settings (e.g., at schools, hospitals and doctor’s offices, home, shops and restaurants, offices, etc.) and involves various actors (e.g., family, friends, public and private service providers). Further, these experiences tackle various social phenomena (e.g., norms regarding dating, premarital relationships and marriage; food and eating; gender roles; parent-child relationships; dressing; shopping and bargaining; etc.). Quantitative data, on the other hand, showed that those who broker more report closer ties to their families (i.e., score higher on family allocentrism), and a higher degree of independence, maturity and a better understanding of the Canadian culture.

 
Apr 28th, 6:00 PM Apr 28th, 8:30 PM

Cultural Brokering and Bicultural Identity: An Exploratory Study

Abstract: Cultural brokering refers to a process where individuals mediate between two parties that are experiencing some type of cultural misunderstanding. Our exploratory study indicates that cultural brokering is a diverse experience that spans the boundaries of one’s family and includes various norms, values and traditions.