Proposal Title

Science education in three acts: Act 3-...and Everything (Final Assessment)

Session Type

Ignite Talk

Room

P&A 148

Start Date

6-7-2017 2:15 PM

Keywords

learning and program outcomes, scientific processes and culture, teaching innovation, assessment

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Criticality – "skillful judgment as to truth, merit, etc.". Scientists are trained to bring critical thinking to their problem-solving; their research design, methodology, data and interpretation(s); and to others' work. In fact, the goal of a PhD is to make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, while also learning the skills of critical analysis. But, do we bring that same level of critical thinking, scholarly reflection, and concepts of evidence to our teaching? Do we teach to engage, motivate and even inspire, or do we simply put as much content as we can into our classes? Although changing in recent years, the sad fact is that those of us teaching in most post-secondary institutions were never trained in pedagogy or the science of learning before we started teaching in our discipline. Many of us know nothing about learning outcomes, nor how to align those with pedagogy and assessment. In this ignite talk, which will be equal parts rant and enthusiastic solutions, I will demonstrate the wide gulf between our methods of teaching and assessment, and the ultimate goals we have in science education, and provide examples of how this gulf can be bridged with a simple change in perspective through some simple activities. Through these examples, participants will see activities that can be translated to their disciplines in ways that encourage student curiosity and engagement, promote critical thinking and problem-solving strategies, and encourage a more process-oriented perspective on science.

Elements of Engagement

Simple and safe chemistry demos, and practical and translatable examples of activities will be used to engage the audience during this very short presentation.

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Jul 6th, 2:15 PM

Science education in three acts: Act 3-...and Everything (Final Assessment)

P&A 148

Criticality – "skillful judgment as to truth, merit, etc.". Scientists are trained to bring critical thinking to their problem-solving; their research design, methodology, data and interpretation(s); and to others' work. In fact, the goal of a PhD is to make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, while also learning the skills of critical analysis. But, do we bring that same level of critical thinking, scholarly reflection, and concepts of evidence to our teaching? Do we teach to engage, motivate and even inspire, or do we simply put as much content as we can into our classes? Although changing in recent years, the sad fact is that those of us teaching in most post-secondary institutions were never trained in pedagogy or the science of learning before we started teaching in our discipline. Many of us know nothing about learning outcomes, nor how to align those with pedagogy and assessment. In this ignite talk, which will be equal parts rant and enthusiastic solutions, I will demonstrate the wide gulf between our methods of teaching and assessment, and the ultimate goals we have in science education, and provide examples of how this gulf can be bridged with a simple change in perspective through some simple activities. Through these examples, participants will see activities that can be translated to their disciplines in ways that encourage student curiosity and engagement, promote critical thinking and problem-solving strategies, and encourage a more process-oriented perspective on science.