Session Type

Workshop

Room

P&A 117

Start Date

7-7-2017 10:45 AM

Keywords

critical thinking, framework, validation, assessment

Primary Threads

Evaluation of Learning

Abstract

The ability to think critically is an essential skill for the next generation of leaders. Post-secondary institutions are required to teach and assess critical thinking (CT) in our programs, but what is CT exactly and how do you assess it? This research project focused on finding a conceptualization of CT that can help us approach these questions from a new angle and provide opportunities to assess CT development.

Many existing ideas of CT contradict each other, creating confusion about what CT is and what it looks like in practice. A common CT framework can alleviate this miscommunication and provide a platform on which structured assessment tools can be built. The Model of Integrated Thinking Skills (MITS) was created by the primary author to fill this gap by connecting recurring themes about CT found in the literature. MITS was validated through an online survey completed by students, faculty, and staff from various disciplines at the University of Guelph. Our results suggest that the framework is accurate/complete, applicable to all disciplines, and enables the reader to distinguish CT from other intellectual skills.

In this workshop, participants will discuss the challenges around teaching/assessing CT, familiarize themselves with MITS and explore how it relates to their experiences with modern science education. We will also talk about the struggles associated with facilitating CT development in students.

Elements of Engagement

This workshop will be largely interactive, with built-in discussion, reflection, brainstorming, and small group activities.


Share

COinS
 
Jul 7th, 10:45 AM

How do I assess an amorphous outcome? A new take on critical thinking.

P&A 117

The ability to think critically is an essential skill for the next generation of leaders. Post-secondary institutions are required to teach and assess critical thinking (CT) in our programs, but what is CT exactly and how do you assess it? This research project focused on finding a conceptualization of CT that can help us approach these questions from a new angle and provide opportunities to assess CT development.

Many existing ideas of CT contradict each other, creating confusion about what CT is and what it looks like in practice. A common CT framework can alleviate this miscommunication and provide a platform on which structured assessment tools can be built. The Model of Integrated Thinking Skills (MITS) was created by the primary author to fill this gap by connecting recurring themes about CT found in the literature. MITS was validated through an online survey completed by students, faculty, and staff from various disciplines at the University of Guelph. Our results suggest that the framework is accurate/complete, applicable to all disciplines, and enables the reader to distinguish CT from other intellectual skills.

In this workshop, participants will discuss the challenges around teaching/assessing CT, familiarize themselves with MITS and explore how it relates to their experiences with modern science education. We will also talk about the struggles associated with facilitating CT development in students.