Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A Rm 148

Start Date

10-7-2015 12:00 AM

Keywords

Gamification, Physics Education, Extrinsic motivators, learning outcomes

Primary Threads

Education Technologies and Innovative Resources

Abstract

Gamification has been extensively studied in corporate settings and has been proven more effective than traditional training programs. Very few studies of gamification have been done in an academic setting, and no studies could be found that measure the motivational effects when compared to a control group. This work evaluated the potential of the gamification of on-line undergraduate physics content as a mechanism to enhance student learning and improve motivation. The main objective of the study was to determine whether extrinsic motivation indicators commonly used in video games are predictive of academic success. Life Science students taking an introductory physics course were tested using gamified multiple choice quizzes. The quizzes incorporated common gaming elements such as points, streaks, leaderboards and achievements, as well as some gamified graphical enhancements and feedback, and were compared to non-gamified control groups. These elements will be further explained and demonstrated in the talk. The gamified elements were not tied to the physics content and can be easily translated to any educational setting. Gamified quiz scores, motivation, engagement, attitudinal data and final grades were compared using standard statistical techniques. Student motivation was quantified through student participation beyond the requirements of the course. The results showed that gaming techniques were significantly correlated to student motivation and engagement outside of the classroom. However, no significant improvement of course grades was expected due to the design of the study. The attitudinal survey data demonstrated a strong correlation between student’s attitudes to the quizzes and their group placement. These correlations may assist instructors in engaging and motivating students outside the classroom in online and distance delivered undergraduate physics content. The gamified platform will be demonstrated for viewers for a better understanding of the game mechanics.

Elements of Engagement

A demonstration of a gaming platform


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Jul 10th, 12:00 AM

Gamification of Physics Education: Enhancing Student Learning With Gamified Online Quizzes

P&A Rm 148

Gamification has been extensively studied in corporate settings and has been proven more effective than traditional training programs. Very few studies of gamification have been done in an academic setting, and no studies could be found that measure the motivational effects when compared to a control group. This work evaluated the potential of the gamification of on-line undergraduate physics content as a mechanism to enhance student learning and improve motivation. The main objective of the study was to determine whether extrinsic motivation indicators commonly used in video games are predictive of academic success. Life Science students taking an introductory physics course were tested using gamified multiple choice quizzes. The quizzes incorporated common gaming elements such as points, streaks, leaderboards and achievements, as well as some gamified graphical enhancements and feedback, and were compared to non-gamified control groups. These elements will be further explained and demonstrated in the talk. The gamified elements were not tied to the physics content and can be easily translated to any educational setting. Gamified quiz scores, motivation, engagement, attitudinal data and final grades were compared using standard statistical techniques. Student motivation was quantified through student participation beyond the requirements of the course. The results showed that gaming techniques were significantly correlated to student motivation and engagement outside of the classroom. However, no significant improvement of course grades was expected due to the design of the study. The attitudinal survey data demonstrated a strong correlation between student’s attitudes to the quizzes and their group placement. These correlations may assist instructors in engaging and motivating students outside the classroom in online and distance delivered undergraduate physics content. The gamified platform will be demonstrated for viewers for a better understanding of the game mechanics.