Title

Paleolimnology and the Frontiers of Biogeography

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-2004

Journal

Physical Geography

Volume

25

Issue

6

First Page

453

Last Page

480

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.2747/0272-3646.25.6.453

Abstract

For almost a century biogeographers have used paleoecological methods, including tree-ring, pollen, macrofossil, and charcoal analysis, to reconstruct climate and environmental conditions for the late Quaternary, but paleolimnological proxies and approaches provide new opportunities for biogeographers. In the last two decades, paleolimnology has grown rapidly as a result of several technical advancements: (1) the development of new proxies, (2) improved coring, sampling, and dating techniques that provide finer temporal resolution, and (3) more sophisticated statistical techniques and greater computing power, which allow for enhanced quantitative calibration of climate and environmental signals from paleolimnological proxies. These advances have led to a plethora of research projects, many using novel approaches, on climate change, anthropogenic impacts, conservation and restoration, aquatic/terrestrial links, resource management, succession, biodiversity, and introduced species. Paleolimnologists are working at the frontiers of biogeographical research, particularly contributing to research on climate change, biogeochemical cycles, and anthropogenic impacts on Earth systems.

Notes

Dr. Katrina Moser is currently a faculty member at The University of Western Ontario.