Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Pathology

Supervisor

Dr. Michael J. Shkrum

Abstract

While it has been consistently demonstrated that fatal motor vehicle collision (MVC) rates are higher for rural than urban roadways, it remains to be elucidated which collision factors account for this difference. Fatal MVC rates have been demonstrated to be higher in rural locations even when controlling for age, restraint use, and vehicle speed. This study aims to assess which collision factors are most prevalent for fatal rural motor vehicle collisions, and to address how those factors differ in significance between rural and urban regions. Our study indicates that a combination of human, environmental, and vehicular factors may account for the fact that the majority of Canadian fatal MVCs occur on rural roadways.


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