Earth Sciences Publications

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2-2016

Journal

Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports

Volume

5

First Page

537

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.01.009

Last Page

541

Abstract

A fundamental research concern within contemporary bioarchaeology is the sensitive balance between the preservation of human remains and the use of destructive techniques to collect information. Here we describe one example of how multiple microspatial destructive/semi-destructive techniques may be carried out in sequence using only the enamel of a single tooth. With careful planning of both sample preparation strategies and sequencing of sampling methods, it is possible to produce multiple datasets, and yet to retain material for future analyses.

In this case, enamel from the teeth of 27 individuals who lived during the early medieval period (AD 1170-1198) in Bergen, Norway, were subjected to histological, trace element (LA-ICP-MS), diagenetic (FTIR), and isotopic analyses (δ18O and δ13C, via micromill/multiprep/IRMS).


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