Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Recent surge in academic and industry-related interest in transit resilience can be partly attributed to the occurrence and impact of disruptive events like Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Katrina and the July 2005 London bombings. Such events have served not only to highlight the vulnerabilities of our public transit systems to natural disasters, targeted attacks and, broadly speaking, unexpected conditions, but also to garner interest in resilience-based approaches to mitigate and recover from the damage caused. In spite of recent gains in developing better understanding of transit resilience, substantial gaps remain in establishing a clear relationship between resilience and transit planning. This relationship is explored through means of an expert survey, with survey responses used to identify disruptive events to transit operation, critical transit infrastructure, disruption mitigation strategies, and the future relevance of transit resilience. The survey was administered to various individuals in academia and in the transportation consulting and transit planning and operation industries. Responses were received from experts from over 15 Canadian institutions and agencies. Survey findings indicate a common industry interest in the implications of enhancing resilience, and a shared regard of resilience as not merely a relevant topic of consideration in planning and operating future transit systems, but also a critical subject of focus.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

TRA-919: A SURVEY-BASED APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING RESILIENCE IMPLICATIONS OF DISRUPTION TO TRANSIT OPERATION

London

Recent surge in academic and industry-related interest in transit resilience can be partly attributed to the occurrence and impact of disruptive events like Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Katrina and the July 2005 London bombings. Such events have served not only to highlight the vulnerabilities of our public transit systems to natural disasters, targeted attacks and, broadly speaking, unexpected conditions, but also to garner interest in resilience-based approaches to mitigate and recover from the damage caused. In spite of recent gains in developing better understanding of transit resilience, substantial gaps remain in establishing a clear relationship between resilience and transit planning. This relationship is explored through means of an expert survey, with survey responses used to identify disruptive events to transit operation, critical transit infrastructure, disruption mitigation strategies, and the future relevance of transit resilience. The survey was administered to various individuals in academia and in the transportation consulting and transit planning and operation industries. Responses were received from experts from over 15 Canadian institutions and agencies. Survey findings indicate a common industry interest in the implications of enhancing resilience, and a shared regard of resilience as not merely a relevant topic of consideration in planning and operating future transit systems, but also a critical subject of focus.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Transportation/8