Title

Rules of Engagement: Residents' Perceptions of the In-training Evaluation Process

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2008

Journal

Academic Medicine

Volume

83

Issue

10 Suppl

First Page

97

Last Page

100

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e318183e78c

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In-training evaluation reports (ITERs) often fall short of their goals of promoting resident learning and development. Efforts to address this problem through faculty development and assessment-instrument modification have been disappointing. The authors explored residents' experiences and perceptions of the ITER process to gain insight into why the process succeeds or fails.

METHOD: Using a grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 residents. Constant comparative analysis for emergent themes was conducted.

RESULTS: All residents identified aspects of "engagement" in the ITER process as the dominant influence on the success of ITERs. Both external (evaluator-driven, such as evaluator credibility) and internal (resident-driven, such as self-assessment) influences on engagement were elaborated. When engagement was lacking, residents viewed the ITER process as inauthentic.

CONCLUSIONS: Engagement is a critical factor to consider when seeking to improve ITER use. Our articulation of external and internal influences on engagement provides a starting point for targeted interventions.

Notes

Dr. Lorelei Lingard is currently a faculty member at The University of Western Ontario.