Event Title

Roundtable 4: No One Is International

Start Date

4-11-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

4-11-2014 3:30 PM

Description

This roundtable brings challenge to the idea of addressing global awareness in the terms of "internationalisation" to begin with. Specifically, this roundtable questions our efforts to identify any of the persons, experiences, or knowledge that we may engage in the academic as "international" versus Canadian.

Particular questions to be addressed:

  • If we presume that all of our studies can somehow be "internationalised," then is there actually any sound boundary between the "national" and the "international" in our studies?
  • If we seek greater understanding of ourselves in complex global contexts and relations in our studies with others from other communities, does it make any sense to facilitate the institution of bureaucratic divisions between "national" students and faculty versus "international" students and faculty?
  • How can we hear, listen to, and learn from the voices of students and faculty members from elsewhere without requiring these voices to fit and speak from ethnic, cultural, or national molds?
  • How can we promote global awareness in our teaching and studies that situates ourselves and our students in the world, rather than reducing the world into national versus international contexts?

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Nov 4th, 1:30 PM Nov 4th, 3:30 PM

Roundtable 4: No One Is International

This roundtable brings challenge to the idea of addressing global awareness in the terms of "internationalisation" to begin with. Specifically, this roundtable questions our efforts to identify any of the persons, experiences, or knowledge that we may engage in the academic as "international" versus Canadian.

Particular questions to be addressed:

  • If we presume that all of our studies can somehow be "internationalised," then is there actually any sound boundary between the "national" and the "international" in our studies?
  • If we seek greater understanding of ourselves in complex global contexts and relations in our studies with others from other communities, does it make any sense to facilitate the institution of bureaucratic divisions between "national" students and faculty versus "international" students and faculty?
  • How can we hear, listen to, and learn from the voices of students and faculty members from elsewhere without requiring these voices to fit and speak from ethnic, cultural, or national molds?
  • How can we promote global awareness in our teaching and studies that situates ourselves and our students in the world, rather than reducing the world into national versus international contexts?