Author Information

Shamiram Zendo MsFollow

Department

Faculty of Information and Media Studies

Program

Health Information Science

Year

5

Supervisor Name

Dr. Anita Kothari and Dr. Marlene Janzen Le Ber

Supervisor Email

akothari@uwo.ca, mleber@uwo.ca

Abstract Text

Background: The Health Equity Indicators were developed by a group of public health practitioners, and academics to assist Local Public Health Agencies (LPHAs), across Ontario, Canada, determine whether their public health programs and activities meet the equity standards required by the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care (MOHLTC). The Health Equity Indicators have been designed to assess organizational internal practice and determine whether programs meet equity standards.

Objective: A realist evaluation is currently underway to determine who these indicators work for and under what conditions, across the LPHAs in the province of Ontario.

Method: Realist methodology has been used to analyze data. This methodology aims to unpack the contexts, mechanisms, and outcomes (C-M-O- configurations), which explain why different outcomes emerge when the same intervention/ program is implemented in various contexts. Furthermore, this analysis explains who the indicators work for, and under what circumstances.

Results/Discussion of implications: The first stage of this evaluation includes the development of a preliminary theory. So far, secondary data from a pilot case study of the Health Equity Indicators have been used to develop a preliminary theory regarding who the indicators work for, and under what circumstances. The results suggest that for the successful uptake of these indicators into public health practice there needs to support from organizational leadership. Moreover, for the successful embedding of any type of health equity measure, a comprehensive information infrastructure should be established, where qualitative and quantitative data is collected and made available on a ubiquitous platform to all staff throughout the organization.

In progress (data not fully collected)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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Realist Evaluation of LDCP Funded Health Equity Indicators

Background: The Health Equity Indicators were developed by a group of public health practitioners, and academics to assist Local Public Health Agencies (LPHAs), across Ontario, Canada, determine whether their public health programs and activities meet the equity standards required by the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care (MOHLTC). The Health Equity Indicators have been designed to assess organizational internal practice and determine whether programs meet equity standards.

Objective: A realist evaluation is currently underway to determine who these indicators work for and under what conditions, across the LPHAs in the province of Ontario.

Method: Realist methodology has been used to analyze data. This methodology aims to unpack the contexts, mechanisms, and outcomes (C-M-O- configurations), which explain why different outcomes emerge when the same intervention/ program is implemented in various contexts. Furthermore, this analysis explains who the indicators work for, and under what circumstances.

Results/Discussion of implications: The first stage of this evaluation includes the development of a preliminary theory. So far, secondary data from a pilot case study of the Health Equity Indicators have been used to develop a preliminary theory regarding who the indicators work for, and under what circumstances. The results suggest that for the successful uptake of these indicators into public health practice there needs to support from organizational leadership. Moreover, for the successful embedding of any type of health equity measure, a comprehensive information infrastructure should be established, where qualitative and quantitative data is collected and made available on a ubiquitous platform to all staff throughout the organization.