Abstract Title

Production of a recombinant protein vaccine for Mannheimia haemolytica in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts

Start Date

16-3-2018 1:15 PM

End Date

16-3-2018 2:30 PM

Abstract Text

The cattle industry worldwide is ravaged by bovine respiratory disease (BRD), a bacterial disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica. Recent efforts to design vaccines against M. haemolytica focus on a virulence factor, leukotoxin, in addition to surface lipoproteins. Plant-based protein production is a safe and inexpensive alternative to traditional methods. Edible vaccines deliver antigens to pharyngeal tissues, which can provide local immunization against M. haemolytica to prior to its progression into the lungs. In this project, M. haemolytica antigens will be produced in lettuce chloroplasts as a candidate edible vaccine for BRD. This endeavor necessitates the adoption and optimization of lettuce growth and transformation and will thereby support future work with transplastomic lettuce.

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Mar 16th, 1:15 PM Mar 16th, 2:30 PM

Production of a recombinant protein vaccine for Mannheimia haemolytica in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts

The cattle industry worldwide is ravaged by bovine respiratory disease (BRD), a bacterial disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica. Recent efforts to design vaccines against M. haemolytica focus on a virulence factor, leukotoxin, in addition to surface lipoproteins. Plant-based protein production is a safe and inexpensive alternative to traditional methods. Edible vaccines deliver antigens to pharyngeal tissues, which can provide local immunization against M. haemolytica to prior to its progression into the lungs. In this project, M. haemolytica antigens will be produced in lettuce chloroplasts as a candidate edible vaccine for BRD. This endeavor necessitates the adoption and optimization of lettuce growth and transformation and will thereby support future work with transplastomic lettuce.