Start Date

16-3-2018 10:03 AM

End Date

16-3-2018 10:15 AM

Abstract Text

Background:

This abstract explores improving health outcomes for Canada’s Indigenous peoples. The increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes in this population makes this a public health problem because diabetes has long-term complications that affect the cardiovascular system and can result in disability and premature death.

Methods:

A literature review using specific search terms was performed to find 36 relevant articles. Search databases for the primary and secondary information were CINAHL and PubMED, respectively.

Results:

The results were classified into five groups: (1) Previous Genetic Protection; (2) Current Day Risk; (3) Diet; (4) Barriers in Developing and Maintaining Health; and (5) Strengths in Developing and Maintaining Health. Non-traditional foods have led to the increased likelihood of developing diabetes by 38%. Social determinants of health act as barriers in managing health. A dissonance between maintaining culture and adapting to modern society has led to acculturation stress, thus increasing the risk of CVD and diabetes in future generations.

Discussion & Conclusion:

While there is a huge knowledge gap, a vital strength displayed in the Indigenous population is a desire for culturally competent education, which can be addressed through health literacy. Support groups and spirituality can help build capacity in managing their health. By building upon these strengths, self-efficacy can be created within Indigenous communities leading to eventual turning-points that can transform barriers into strengths.

Interdisciplinary Reflection:

Concepts from the biological and social sciences are combined to show a better representation of the upstream issues that have resulted in an increased prevalence of diabetes and CVD in the Indigenous population.

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Mar 16th, 10:03 AM Mar 16th, 10:15 AM

Improving Canadian Indigenous Health: Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease

Background:

This abstract explores improving health outcomes for Canada’s Indigenous peoples. The increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes in this population makes this a public health problem because diabetes has long-term complications that affect the cardiovascular system and can result in disability and premature death.

Methods:

A literature review using specific search terms was performed to find 36 relevant articles. Search databases for the primary and secondary information were CINAHL and PubMED, respectively.

Results:

The results were classified into five groups: (1) Previous Genetic Protection; (2) Current Day Risk; (3) Diet; (4) Barriers in Developing and Maintaining Health; and (5) Strengths in Developing and Maintaining Health. Non-traditional foods have led to the increased likelihood of developing diabetes by 38%. Social determinants of health act as barriers in managing health. A dissonance between maintaining culture and adapting to modern society has led to acculturation stress, thus increasing the risk of CVD and diabetes in future generations.

Discussion & Conclusion:

While there is a huge knowledge gap, a vital strength displayed in the Indigenous population is a desire for culturally competent education, which can be addressed through health literacy. Support groups and spirituality can help build capacity in managing their health. By building upon these strengths, self-efficacy can be created within Indigenous communities leading to eventual turning-points that can transform barriers into strengths.

Interdisciplinary Reflection:

Concepts from the biological and social sciences are combined to show a better representation of the upstream issues that have resulted in an increased prevalence of diabetes and CVD in the Indigenous population.