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Welcome to the Western Public Health Casebooks page. Herein you will find teaching cases authored by students, faculty members, and community partners, as well as summaries of the Integrative Workshops that were held over the last few years. Our goal is to create a searchable database of freely available public health cases, for use by any program across the world.

We welcome feedback and comments on these cases. To do this, please be in touch via the program’s email: publichealth@schulich.uwo.ca.

These casebooks can also be found on our site .

Current Casebook: 2020

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Preface
Amardeep Thind

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Acknowledgements
Gerald McKinley and Mark Speechley

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Case 2 : The Double Burden of Malnutrition: Challenges and Opportunities in Thailand
Leshawn Benedict, Phudit Tejativaddhana, Vijj Kasemsup, Seo Ah Hong, and Gerald McKinley

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Case 10 : Changing the Service Delivery Model: How to Make it Happen?
Shradha Pandey, Yoshith Perera, and Mark Speechley

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Case 11 : Going Beyond the Virus: Understanding the Drivers of the Ebola Virus Outbreak
Reshel Perera, Michel Deilgat, Suzanne Boucher, and Ava A. John-Baptiste

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Case 12 : Prioritizing Emerging and Re-Emerging Non-enteric Zoonotic Infectious Diseases: What Should we be Afraid of Next?
Jessica Schill, Michel P. Deilgat, Julie Thériault, Rukshanda Ahmad, and Amanda L. Terry

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Case 13 : Preparing for the Tickpocalypse
Rayda Sheikh, Fatih Sekercioglu, and Mark Speechley

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Case 14 : A Sticky Situation: A Medical Problem with a Social Solution
Stephanie Susman, Natasha Crowcroft, and Amardeep Thind

Editors

Gerald McKinley, PhD

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine,
Schulich Interfaculty Program in Public Health,
Western University,
London, Canada

Mark Speechley, PhD

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
Schulich Interfaculty Program in Public Health,
Western University
London, Canada

Acknowledgements.

The 2020 Western Public Health Casebook reflects the diversity in, and challenges of public health practice. Each case offers a unique take on a complex public health issue. Our cases go beyond describing the problem; the cases present a narrative around decision makers and stakeholders who are experiencing these challenges firsthand. Readers are encouraged to ‘step into the shoes’ of the protagonist (be they an individual or a group), and think critically about the complexity and nuances inherent in public health practice. There are no right or wrong answers to each case. In fact, we believe it is the best cases that leave you with more questions than answers. We hope these cases make you think about challenges and better yet, allow you the opportunity to brainstorm meaningful solutions to today’s most challenging issues.

We would like to express our gratitude to the following organizations (and the preceptors/supervisors) who supported the training of our students and the development of the cases in this Casebook: Lambton Public Health, ASEAN Institute for Health Development (Mahidol University), Diabetes Alliance Team (Western University), Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, Canadian Red Cross, Lawson Health Research Institute (St. Joseph's Health Care), Human Environments Analysis Lab (HEAL, Western University), Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (Public Health Liaison Unit, Migrant Health Branch), Public Health Agency of Canada, Moyo Health & Community Services, Public Health Ontario, and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

The cases that appear in this book are the hard work and dedication of a team we are so proud to be a part of. In particular, thank you to our case authors: you are supporting the pedagogy of public health and providing essential material to help the next generation of public health leaders grow. The final polished look of this book would not be possible without our copy editors and the careful eye of the MPH Program staff. As editors, it is our privilege to provide this book as a tool to further the learning, the thinking, and the progress of helping the world’s population recognize the goals of public health.