Title of Research Output

Excavations at North Field Poster

Student Information

Sydney G. DurhamFollow

Faculty

Arts and Humanities

Supervisor Name

Dr. Elizabeth M. Greene

Keywords

Archaeology, Excavation, Context, Artifacts, Roman, Military

Description

Ongoing excavations of the North Field,Vindolanda site reveal fascinating results about the military occupation of early Roman-Britain. Features of the industrial complex (kiln and dryers), ash and smoke pits, ditch cuts, and artifacts of tools, ceramics and everyday objects help archaeologists contextualize military life and production here at the North Field. The excavation of three early shallow cut ditches between 2010-2014 reinforce that the site hadprolonged occupation and use of the fort pre-dated the main site’s earliest date of 85 AD, possibly for construction and/or defensive purposes. The excavation of the later small and large kiln/dryer reveal continued production of vessels and decorated ceramics. This poster highlights key finds of the excavations to display both importance of archaeological contexts and the high activity and continuity of this extramural settlement and how it differs from occupation of the main fort at Vindolanda.

Acknowledgements

Greene, E.M., Meyer, A. (2017). The North Field Excavations at Vindolanda: Preliminary Report on the 2009–14 Exploratory Field Seasons. Mouseion: Journal of the Classical Association of Canada, 14 (2), 197-251.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Document Type

Poster

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Excavations at North Field Poster

Ongoing excavations of the North Field,Vindolanda site reveal fascinating results about the military occupation of early Roman-Britain. Features of the industrial complex (kiln and dryers), ash and smoke pits, ditch cuts, and artifacts of tools, ceramics and everyday objects help archaeologists contextualize military life and production here at the North Field. The excavation of three early shallow cut ditches between 2010-2014 reinforce that the site hadprolonged occupation and use of the fort pre-dated the main site’s earliest date of 85 AD, possibly for construction and/or defensive purposes. The excavation of the later small and large kiln/dryer reveal continued production of vessels and decorated ceramics. This poster highlights key finds of the excavations to display both importance of archaeological contexts and the high activity and continuity of this extramural settlement and how it differs from occupation of the main fort at Vindolanda.