Event Title

Predictors of Health and Developmental Trajectories among Aboriginal Preschool-aged Children in Canada: Effects of Family- and Community-level Characteristics

Presenter Information

Piotr Wilk

Start Date

16-10-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

16-10-2009 10:30 AM

Description

The purpose of this study is to examine the differences in major health trajectories between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. We hypothesize that community conditions affect child health even when child and family characteristics are considered. In order to test this hypothesis, we identify a model of Aboriginal child health that consists of three broad conceptual categories of health determinants: community conditions, family environment, and child characteristics. By placing a strong emphasis on the community-specific determinants of health, the model provides an alternative paradigm that accentuates the role of geographic, cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts of Aboriginal child health. We propose to test the model by conducting a secondary data analysis on the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (Cycles 1-7) and the 1996-2006 Census of Canada Microdata filed. These files contain information on Aboriginal children, their families, and the communities in which they live. The results of this research will provide communities and governments the necessary information to identify priorities and set standards for programs and policies to enhance the health and well-being of Aboriginal children. Analysis of the longitudinal data will be conducted primarily through various latent growth curve modeling techniques within the context of structural equation modeling.

Piotr Wilk is the Community Health Researcher/Educator at the Middlesex-London Health Unit, with a research focus on the health and well being of children. Dr. Wilk is currently conducting research on how the socio-economic conditions in which children are born and grow up affect their health and developmental trajectories. Dr. Wilk also focuses his research on health of Aboriginal children by examining the role of contextual predictors related to family characteristics and community/neighborhood characteristics. He is also involved in teaching advanced graduate courses in social statistics and quantitative research methods.

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Oct 16th, 9:00 AM Oct 16th, 10:30 AM

Predictors of Health and Developmental Trajectories among Aboriginal Preschool-aged Children in Canada: Effects of Family- and Community-level Characteristics

The purpose of this study is to examine the differences in major health trajectories between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. We hypothesize that community conditions affect child health even when child and family characteristics are considered. In order to test this hypothesis, we identify a model of Aboriginal child health that consists of three broad conceptual categories of health determinants: community conditions, family environment, and child characteristics. By placing a strong emphasis on the community-specific determinants of health, the model provides an alternative paradigm that accentuates the role of geographic, cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts of Aboriginal child health. We propose to test the model by conducting a secondary data analysis on the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (Cycles 1-7) and the 1996-2006 Census of Canada Microdata filed. These files contain information on Aboriginal children, their families, and the communities in which they live. The results of this research will provide communities and governments the necessary information to identify priorities and set standards for programs and policies to enhance the health and well-being of Aboriginal children. Analysis of the longitudinal data will be conducted primarily through various latent growth curve modeling techniques within the context of structural equation modeling.

Piotr Wilk is the Community Health Researcher/Educator at the Middlesex-London Health Unit, with a research focus on the health and well being of children. Dr. Wilk is currently conducting research on how the socio-economic conditions in which children are born and grow up affect their health and developmental trajectories. Dr. Wilk also focuses his research on health of Aboriginal children by examining the role of contextual predictors related to family characteristics and community/neighborhood characteristics. He is also involved in teaching advanced graduate courses in social statistics and quantitative research methods.