Event Title

Poster Introductions III--The Association between Depression-related Disorders, Chronic Physical Conditions and Leisure-time Physical Activity among Canadians in Late Life: Results from the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 2.1)

Start Date

15-10-2009 5:15 PM

End Date

15-10-2009 5:30 PM

Description

Introduction: The benefits of leisure-time physical activity on mental and physical health among older adults are well documented; however, few studies have explored the association between depression and leisure-time physical activity within a theoretical framework.

Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between depression and leisure-time physical activity among community-dwelling, Canadian adults aged 65 and older, using a modified version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework.

Method: This study included a weighted sample of 3,785,145 community- dwelling, seniors aged 65 years or older who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 2.1). Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to examine the cross-sectional association between depression-related disorders and leisure-time physical activity in the context of chronic physical conditions, personal characteristics and environmental factors (e.g., gender, rural versus urban residence, immigration status, etc.).

Results: Older adults reporting depression-related disorders were less likely to participate in leisure-time physical activity after adjusting for relevant personal and environmental factors (odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, p < 0.001). This association was partially mediated by activity limitations associated with depression- related disorders. Similar results were observed between chronic physical conditions and participation in leisure-time physical activity (ORs ranged from 0.65 to 0.81, p <0.001). There was no evidence of a statistical interaction between depression-related and chronic physical conditions.

Conclusion: Although the present study was unable to identify the temporal relationships among study variables, the results provide clinicians who care for older adults with depression and/or chronic physical diseases with potentially useful information on the benefits of physical activity. They also provide evidence in support of community-based exercise or leisure-time physical activity program for seniors who are physically inactive to prevent chronic mental or physical illnesses and reduced quality of life.

Geum Ju Song was born in South Korea and holds a Bachelor of Science (1997) and a Masters of Science (2003) in Physical Education from Seoul Women’s University, Korea and a Masters of Science in Health Studies and Gerontology from University of Waterloo (2009). The title of my Master’s thesis from the University of Waterloo is “The Association between Depression-related Disorders, Chronic Physical Conditions and Leisure-time Physical activity among Canadians in Late Life: Results from the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 2.1)”. Current research area in the Ph.D. program, University of Waterloo is the effect of physical activity on mental health among the elderly population.

This document is currently not available here.


Share

COinS
 
Oct 15th, 5:15 PM Oct 15th, 5:30 PM

Poster Introductions III--The Association between Depression-related Disorders, Chronic Physical Conditions and Leisure-time Physical Activity among Canadians in Late Life: Results from the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 2.1)

Introduction: The benefits of leisure-time physical activity on mental and physical health among older adults are well documented; however, few studies have explored the association between depression and leisure-time physical activity within a theoretical framework.

Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between depression and leisure-time physical activity among community-dwelling, Canadian adults aged 65 and older, using a modified version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework.

Method: This study included a weighted sample of 3,785,145 community- dwelling, seniors aged 65 years or older who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 2.1). Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to examine the cross-sectional association between depression-related disorders and leisure-time physical activity in the context of chronic physical conditions, personal characteristics and environmental factors (e.g., gender, rural versus urban residence, immigration status, etc.).

Results: Older adults reporting depression-related disorders were less likely to participate in leisure-time physical activity after adjusting for relevant personal and environmental factors (odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, p < 0.001). This association was partially mediated by activity limitations associated with depression- related disorders. Similar results were observed between chronic physical conditions and participation in leisure-time physical activity (ORs ranged from 0.65 to 0.81, p <0.001). There was no evidence of a statistical interaction between depression-related and chronic physical conditions.

Conclusion: Although the present study was unable to identify the temporal relationships among study variables, the results provide clinicians who care for older adults with depression and/or chronic physical diseases with potentially useful information on the benefits of physical activity. They also provide evidence in support of community-based exercise or leisure-time physical activity program for seniors who are physically inactive to prevent chronic mental or physical illnesses and reduced quality of life.

Geum Ju Song was born in South Korea and holds a Bachelor of Science (1997) and a Masters of Science (2003) in Physical Education from Seoul Women’s University, Korea and a Masters of Science in Health Studies and Gerontology from University of Waterloo (2009). The title of my Master’s thesis from the University of Waterloo is “The Association between Depression-related Disorders, Chronic Physical Conditions and Leisure-time Physical activity among Canadians in Late Life: Results from the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 2.1)”. Current research area in the Ph.D. program, University of Waterloo is the effect of physical activity on mental health among the elderly population.