Event Title

Poster Introductions III--The Influence of Childhood Poverty on the Self-Management of Heart Disease in Later Life

Presenter Information

Sally Lindsay

Start Date

15-10-2009 5:15 PM

End Date

15-10-2009 5:30 PM

Description

There is growing evidence to suggest that childhood deprivation is linked to social inequalities and has important consequences for health in later life. Past studies tend to focus on the influence of cumulative deprivation on the risk of developing a particular disease. This study is innovative because it explores how deprivation in childhood may be linked to how people (who already have a disease) self-manage their condition in later life. This research adds to the theoretical knowledge of accumulation of risk theory by providing a broader theoretical link between social conditions and health in understanding how contextual factors influence the self-management of heart disease. The sample was drawn from Salford, Greater Manchester, UK because nearly half of the wards are in the top 10% of the most deprived wards in England, including an increased risk for heart disease. The sample consisted of adults aged 50-74, which was drawn from general practitioners coronary heart disease registries (n=91). Questionnaires from each participant and 30 focus groups were collected from May 2006 to September 2007. The findings suggest that childhood deprivation may influence health behaviours and lifestyle in later life amongst patients with coronary heart disease, especially with respect to diet, health locus of control and doctor visits. Participants whose parents rented their house during their childhood had poorer current diets (eating bad foods more often) and significantly more current doctor visits compared to those whose parents owned their house. The results also suggest that fathers’ occupations significantly influenced their current diet and health locus of control. In conclusion, deprivation accumulated during childhood appears to influence the current self-management behaviours amongst heart patients from a deprived urban area of Northern England.

Sally Lindsay, PhD (Health Sociology), is a Scientist at Bloorview Research Institute at Bloorview Kids Rehab within the ‘Participation and Inclusion’ theme. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the sociology of health, social inclusion and participation, social / health inequalities, children with disabilities, and chronic disease self-management. Her current projects include assessing anti-bullying interventions; and understanding the underutilization of assistive devices among children.

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Oct 15th, 5:15 PM Oct 15th, 5:30 PM

Poster Introductions III--The Influence of Childhood Poverty on the Self-Management of Heart Disease in Later Life

There is growing evidence to suggest that childhood deprivation is linked to social inequalities and has important consequences for health in later life. Past studies tend to focus on the influence of cumulative deprivation on the risk of developing a particular disease. This study is innovative because it explores how deprivation in childhood may be linked to how people (who already have a disease) self-manage their condition in later life. This research adds to the theoretical knowledge of accumulation of risk theory by providing a broader theoretical link between social conditions and health in understanding how contextual factors influence the self-management of heart disease. The sample was drawn from Salford, Greater Manchester, UK because nearly half of the wards are in the top 10% of the most deprived wards in England, including an increased risk for heart disease. The sample consisted of adults aged 50-74, which was drawn from general practitioners coronary heart disease registries (n=91). Questionnaires from each participant and 30 focus groups were collected from May 2006 to September 2007. The findings suggest that childhood deprivation may influence health behaviours and lifestyle in later life amongst patients with coronary heart disease, especially with respect to diet, health locus of control and doctor visits. Participants whose parents rented their house during their childhood had poorer current diets (eating bad foods more often) and significantly more current doctor visits compared to those whose parents owned their house. The results also suggest that fathers’ occupations significantly influenced their current diet and health locus of control. In conclusion, deprivation accumulated during childhood appears to influence the current self-management behaviours amongst heart patients from a deprived urban area of Northern England.

Sally Lindsay, PhD (Health Sociology), is a Scientist at Bloorview Research Institute at Bloorview Kids Rehab within the ‘Participation and Inclusion’ theme. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the sociology of health, social inclusion and participation, social / health inequalities, children with disabilities, and chronic disease self-management. Her current projects include assessing anti-bullying interventions; and understanding the underutilization of assistive devices among children.