Event Title

Poster Introductions I--Health of Newly Arrived Immigrant Youth: Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC)

Presenter Information

Bosu Seo

Start Date

15-10-2009 12:00 PM

End Date

15-10-2009 12:15 PM

Description

The immigrant population is large and growing. Nearly one in five persons living in Canada was born abroad (Statistics Canada, 2007). They are younger than the Canadian-born population. These two demographic factors imply that immigrant youth will play a significant role in Canada over the next decade. While immigrant youth have been the focus of a significant body of research, their health concerns have been largely ignored (Seo and Senauer, 2006).

We will use a RDC data, the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) to explore health concerns and outcomes of newly arrived immigrant youth. LSIC has three waves. Approximately 21,000 people aged 15 and over were selected out of 250,000 immigrants who settled in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001. 12,040 participated in wave 1. The first 2 waves of interviews were conducted 6 months and 2 years after arrival, respectively. Wave 2 had 9,322 respondents and wave 3 had 7,700 respondents. The interviews were conducted in 1 of 15 languages most frequently spoken by new immigrants, including English and French.

We will follow the 16% of sample whose age was between 15 and 24 in wave 1. Given the longitudinal nature of LSIC, we will be able to examine changes in health outcomes over the period of the study and examine changes in “healthy immigrant effects”. Understanding their health status will provide us a guideline to create public policies and programs for healthy Canadians.

The research questions to be answered are: · What are the health status and utilization of immigrant youth over the short-term stage of integration? · How much of any observed immigrant youth utilization to health service can be explained by measured barriers, such as access barriers and linguistic difficulties? · Is “healthy immigrant effect” observed among immigrant youth? If yes, does it disappear over years and how fast does it disappear?

Bosu Seo is a CIHR Post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Manitoba and is leading a Manitoba Center for Health Policy (MCHP) deliverable project, entitled “Profile of Immigrant Health Status and Health Care Use Patters”. The report is being done at the request of Manitoba Health and Healthy Living and will be publicly released in March 2011. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Economics from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in health economics and applied labor economics, particularly health disparity (gender and race), social determinants of health, and cancer survivorship (childhood cancer). Recently, his wife, Sukhee Choe, and their two-year old son, Danny, joined him in Winnipeg from Minneapolis so that he can play Thomas and Friends with Danny again when he is outside of economics.

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Oct 15th, 12:00 PM Oct 15th, 12:15 PM

Poster Introductions I--Health of Newly Arrived Immigrant Youth: Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC)

The immigrant population is large and growing. Nearly one in five persons living in Canada was born abroad (Statistics Canada, 2007). They are younger than the Canadian-born population. These two demographic factors imply that immigrant youth will play a significant role in Canada over the next decade. While immigrant youth have been the focus of a significant body of research, their health concerns have been largely ignored (Seo and Senauer, 2006).

We will use a RDC data, the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) to explore health concerns and outcomes of newly arrived immigrant youth. LSIC has three waves. Approximately 21,000 people aged 15 and over were selected out of 250,000 immigrants who settled in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001. 12,040 participated in wave 1. The first 2 waves of interviews were conducted 6 months and 2 years after arrival, respectively. Wave 2 had 9,322 respondents and wave 3 had 7,700 respondents. The interviews were conducted in 1 of 15 languages most frequently spoken by new immigrants, including English and French.

We will follow the 16% of sample whose age was between 15 and 24 in wave 1. Given the longitudinal nature of LSIC, we will be able to examine changes in health outcomes over the period of the study and examine changes in “healthy immigrant effects”. Understanding their health status will provide us a guideline to create public policies and programs for healthy Canadians.

The research questions to be answered are: · What are the health status and utilization of immigrant youth over the short-term stage of integration? · How much of any observed immigrant youth utilization to health service can be explained by measured barriers, such as access barriers and linguistic difficulties? · Is “healthy immigrant effect” observed among immigrant youth? If yes, does it disappear over years and how fast does it disappear?

Bosu Seo is a CIHR Post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Manitoba and is leading a Manitoba Center for Health Policy (MCHP) deliverable project, entitled “Profile of Immigrant Health Status and Health Care Use Patters”. The report is being done at the request of Manitoba Health and Healthy Living and will be publicly released in March 2011. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Economics from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in health economics and applied labor economics, particularly health disparity (gender and race), social determinants of health, and cancer survivorship (childhood cancer). Recently, his wife, Sukhee Choe, and their two-year old son, Danny, joined him in Winnipeg from Minneapolis so that he can play Thomas and Friends with Danny again when he is outside of economics.