Undergraduate Honors Theses

Date of Award

Spring 4-10-2014

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. William Fisher

Second Advisor

Taylor Kohut

Abstract

Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills Model, the present study examined the relationship between condom use motivation and behavioural skills and their independent and joint influence on condom use consistency among adolescent heterosexual males. Participants were 98 currently sexually active, heterosexual males aged 18-23 (M = 18.5). Each participant was given a series of questionnaires to measure 5 dimensions od Attitudes Towards Condoms, Perceptions of Social Norms, condom use consistency, 3 types of condom-obtaining negotiation strategies, and 4 types of condom-avoiding negotiation strategies. Results indicated that the Pleasure dimension of Attitudes towards condoms, was positively correlated with condom use and the condom obtaining strategy Risk Information/Request, and negatively correlated with the condom avoiding strategies Dislike of condoms and Seduction. Perceptions of Social Norms were also positively correlated with condom use and the condom-obtaining strategies Risk Information/Request and Direct Verbal/Nonverbal Communication, while negatively correlated with the condom avoiding strategies Dislike of Condoms and Seduction. Furthermore, these condom negotiation strategies partially mediated the respective relationships between motivational constructs and condom use consistency. Overall, these findings promote the need for intervention strategies that focus on dyadic negotiation and communication as a predictor for condom use, and implications for future research were discussed.

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