Lifestyle Research Team

Category

Lifestyle and Healthy Aging

Publication Date

Spring 4-26-2018

Journal

PLoS ONE

Volume

13

Issue

4

First Page

1

Last Page

17

URL with Digital Object Identifier

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196356

Abstract

Background

We investigated the effects of multiple-modality exercise with additional mind-motor training on cognition in community-dwelling older adults with subjective cognitive complaints.

Methods

Participants (n = 127, mean age 67.5 [7.3] years, 71% women) were randomized to receive 45 minutes of multiple-modality exercise with additional 15 minutes of either mind-motor training (M4, n = 63) or control (balance, range of motion and breathing exercises [M2, n = 64]). In total, both groups exercised 60 minutes/day, 3 days/week, for 24 weeks. Standardized global cognitive functioning (GCF), concentration, reasoning, planning, and memory were assessed at 24 weeks and after a 28-week no-contact follow-up.

Results

There were no significant differences in the study primary outcomes. The M4 group, however, showed trends for greater improvements in GCF and memory (both, P = .07) compared to the M2 group at 24 weeks. Significant differences between group in GCF (P = .03) and memory (P= .02) were observed after the 28-week no-contact follow-up favouring the M4 group.

Discussion

Additional mind-motor training did not impart immediate greater benefits to cognition among the study participants.

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