Location

Victoria South Ballroom, Ottawa Marriott Hotel

Event Website

http://sociology.uwo.ca/cluster/en/projects/knowledge_mobilization/2015/2015_conference/index.html#2015 Conference

Start Date

19-3-2015 12:30 PM

End Date

19-3-2015 12:45 PM

Description

Poster Presentation

Children across sub-Saharan Africa reside in a variety of different living arrangements. In slum communities with high rates of circular migration and urban poverty, parents may choose alternative living arrangements for young children other than co-residence. Despite the importance of residence for child well-being, we know relatively little about the number of children out-fostered from slums and with whom they reside. Using birth history data from the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System collected between 2005 and 2009, we will determine percentages of children under 15 living away from their mothers by mothers’ migrant status and duration of stay. We use logistic regression to analyze characteristics of migrant and non-migrant mothers in order to determine what may influence child fosterage out of Nairobi’s slum settlements. We find approximately 15% of children under age 15 live apart from their mothers, with mothers’ socio-demographic characteristics, child’s age, and mother’s migrant status associated with child fostering.


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Mar 19th, 12:30 PM Mar 19th, 12:45 PM

Does Mother's Migrant Status Affect Child Fostering in sub-Saharan Africa?: Evidence from Two Informal Settlements in Nairobi, Kenya

Victoria South Ballroom, Ottawa Marriott Hotel

Poster Presentation

Children across sub-Saharan Africa reside in a variety of different living arrangements. In slum communities with high rates of circular migration and urban poverty, parents may choose alternative living arrangements for young children other than co-residence. Despite the importance of residence for child well-being, we know relatively little about the number of children out-fostered from slums and with whom they reside. Using birth history data from the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System collected between 2005 and 2009, we will determine percentages of children under 15 living away from their mothers by mothers’ migrant status and duration of stay. We use logistic regression to analyze characteristics of migrant and non-migrant mothers in order to determine what may influence child fosterage out of Nairobi’s slum settlements. We find approximately 15% of children under age 15 live apart from their mothers, with mothers’ socio-demographic characteristics, child’s age, and mother’s migrant status associated with child fostering.

https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/pclc_conf/2015/Day1/17

 

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