Nursing Publications

Title

Effects of Workplace Incivility and Empowerment on Newly-graduated Nurses’ Organizational Commitment

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-2010

Journal

Journal of Nursing Management

Volume

18

Issue

8

First Page

1004

Last Page

1015

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2834.2010.01165.x

Abstract

Aim  The purpose of the present study was to test an expanded model of Kanter’s theory by examining the influence of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the organizational commitment of newly-graduated nurses.

Background  The first years of practise represent an important confidence-building phase for newly-graduated nurses, yet many new nurses are exposed to disempowering experiences and incivility in the workplace.

Method  A predictive non-experimental design was used to examine the impact of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the affective commitment of newly-graduated nurses (n = 117) working in acute care hospitals.

Results  Controlling for age, 23.1% of the variance in affective commitment was explained by structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility [R² = 0.231, F5,107 = 6.43, P = 0.000]. Access to opportunity was the most empowering factor, with access to support and formal power perceived as least empowering. Perceived co-worker incivility was greater than perceived supervisor incivility.

Conclusion  Results offer significant support for the use of Kanter’s theory in the newly-graduated nurse population.

Implications for Nursing Management  Without specific strategies in place to combat incivility and disempowerment in the workplace, attempts to prevent further organizational attrition of new members may be futile.