Abstract

The truth commission of Guatemala stated that a genocide was committed against Indigenous Peoples in Guatemala. The truth commission of Canada concluded that a cultural genocide was committed against Aboriginal Peoples in Canada. The article questions the contribution of the truth commissions of Guatemala and Canada to the recognition of a genocide. Their contribution is analyzed in two areas. The article argues that the work of the two truth commissions shows that the context of a country and the perception of the crime influence the findings on genocide. It also states that the work of the two truth commissions on genocide is part of a movement towards an evolution of the 1948 United Nations Genocide Convention.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the Robson Hall Law School, the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, and the persons who help me to conduct my research during my visiting scholarship at the University of Manitoba: Professor Andrew Woolford, Raymond Frogner, Matthew Renaud, Donna Sikorsky, Helen Fallding, and Gail Mackisey.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.


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