Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2019

Journal

Faculty Publications

URL with Digital Object Identifier

DOI: 10.1177/1073191117694747

Abstract

The Ruminative Thought Scale (RTS) was developed to measure the ruminative thinking style, presumably common to various psychopathological disorders. However, prior factor-analytic research was inconclusive regarding unidimensionality versus multidimensionality of the RTS. The present study was conducted on a large, heterogeneous Serbian sample (N = 838). A subsample was retested 6 months later providing information about symptoms of depression and various anxiety symptoms. Results showed that a bifactor model of the RTS (representing one general and four group factors) had a better fit than the second-order and one-factor models. The subscale scores were not prospective predictors of symptoms of depression and anxiety, over and above the contribution of the total score. The RTS is a reliable transdiagnostic measure of repetitive thinking. Although there is some clustering of more homogeneous items, there is not enough evidence to support interpretation of the subscales.

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