Location

Law Building 51/52

Start Date

22-3-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

22-3-2019 1:30 PM

Description

This qualitative research study explores the impact on female singers’ musical and gender identities when confronted with the issue of infertility. Based on interviews with female vocalists (N=2), and reflections of my personal experiences as a singer and voice instructor experiencing infertility, this research explores the physiological, emotional, and social impact that infertility has on female singers' identities. The sensitive nature of infertility impedes open discussion regarding its impact on singers' physiological and emotional health; an issue I wished to address in this research. While each participant’s experience with infertility was unique, analysis of personal interview transcripts revealed a common tendency for life course alteration due to their experiences with infertility. These alterations impacted the personal and professional identities of the two participants, including interpersonal relationships, education and career paths, and physical and emotional health. This innovative research positively contributes to the fields of vocal health, pedagogy, and performance by creating a space for open communication on the stigmatized topic of infertility among singers, vocal health specialists, and voice pedagogues.

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Mar 22nd, 12:00 PM Mar 22nd, 1:30 PM

The Impact of Infertility on Female Vocalist Identity

Law Building 51/52

This qualitative research study explores the impact on female singers’ musical and gender identities when confronted with the issue of infertility. Based on interviews with female vocalists (N=2), and reflections of my personal experiences as a singer and voice instructor experiencing infertility, this research explores the physiological, emotional, and social impact that infertility has on female singers' identities. The sensitive nature of infertility impedes open discussion regarding its impact on singers' physiological and emotional health; an issue I wished to address in this research. While each participant’s experience with infertility was unique, analysis of personal interview transcripts revealed a common tendency for life course alteration due to their experiences with infertility. These alterations impacted the personal and professional identities of the two participants, including interpersonal relationships, education and career paths, and physical and emotional health. This innovative research positively contributes to the fields of vocal health, pedagogy, and performance by creating a space for open communication on the stigmatized topic of infertility among singers, vocal health specialists, and voice pedagogues.