Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Thesis Format

Integrated Article

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Nursing

Supervisor

Dr. Michael Kerr

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test a theoretical model linking authentic leadership to new graduate nurses’ job satisfaction through its effect on new graduate support. This study was a secondary analysis of Time 1 baseline data collected in a two-wave national study of Canadian new graduate nurses, which used a non-experimental, predictive survey design. A convenience sample of 215 new graduate nurses with less than two years of experience, working in direct care, was obtained through The College of Nurses of Ontario. Hayes’ PROCESS macro for SPSS, version 3 was used to test the hypothesized simple mediation model. Overall, the model accounted for approximately 31% of the variance in Ontario new graduate nurses’ job satisfaction. Moreover, all four hypothesized direct and indirect relationships were found to be positive and significant. Findings suggested that authentic nursing leaders may contribute to improved new graduate support and new graduate nurse job satisfaction.

Keywords: authentic leadership, new graduate support, job satisfaction, retention, turnover, new graduate nurse, registered nurses, transition experience, nursing shortage

Summary for Lay Audience

Canada, like many other developed countries, is facing a serious shortage of nurses due its aging population, aging nursing workforce, higher workloads, limited resources, and stressful working conditions. New graduate nurses have been recognized as precious health human resources that are fundamental in addressing this shortage. While evidence suggests the significant and positive influence of authentic leaders on new graduate nurses job satisfaction, it is important to have an understanding of the mechanisms that mediate this relationship.

This study examined the effect of authentic leadership on new graduate nurses’ job satisfaction using data collected in a two-wave national study of Canadian new graduate nurses. This study used data from a sample of 215 new graduate nurses with less than two years of experience, working in direct care in Ontario. New graduate nurses were sent a survey in the mail and instructed to rate their nurse managers’ authentic leadership, their perceptions regarding new graduate support in the workplace, as well as their degree of job satisfaction.

Overall, this study found that the rather new relational leadership style, authentic leadership, had a positive influence on Ontario new graduate nurses’ job satisfaction. The findings of this study suggested that authentic leaders are able to improve new graduate nurses’ job satisfaction by providing new graduate support in the workplace. New graduate support incorporates the specific supports essential for the successful transition of new graduate nurses, including high quality managers, preceptors and mentors, encouragement and constructive feedback, positive communication amongst staff, a supportive unit culture, as well as opportunities for professional growth and development.

Healthcare and educational organizations should collaborate on ways to ensure new graduate nurses are supported in the workplace, especially during their first two years of practice. In addition, they should prioritize the planning, recruitment, development, and evaluation of nurse managers, due to nurse managers’ ability to improve the work environment, as well as the job satisfaction of their front-line nursing staff. In doing so, they will contribute to the creation of a sustainable nursing workforce that is able to meet the healthcare needs of the future.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Available for download on Saturday, December 31, 2022

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