Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1999

Journal

Australian Historical Studies

Volume

29

Issue

113

First Page

267

Last Page

285

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10314619908596102

Abstract

Much information on traditional indigenous society in Australian historiography and anthropology stems from the vast store of eyewitness accounts left by missionaries, settlers and government officials. How cautious does one need to be in using such material? After all that it reveals about the moral and legal universe of its writers, can it speak reliably about traditional society? This article traces the production of knowledge about indigenous gender relations at Cape York Peninsula through a lineage of sources from the 1890s to the 1990s and concludes that unless the assumptions embedded in the primary sources are clearly identified, the discourse on Aboriginal womanhood continues to be a colonising project.

Find in your library

Share

COinS