Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Authors

John Maynard

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2009

Journal

Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)

Volume

26

Issue

16

First Page

2376

Last Page

2396

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09523360903457031

Abstract

This article will examine the impact of Aboriginal sporting participation and movement around the globe. The experiences, influences and inspiration that Aboriginal sporting men and women absorbed while travelling internationally have played a prominent role in changing the perceptions and understanding of Aboriginal people to the wider populace. The later stages of the nineteenth and early twentieth century were a period in which Aboriginal people were erroneously categorized as a dying race, belonging to the Stone Age and uneducable. However the influence of sport and travel ensured that Aboriginal cricketers, footballers, athletes, boxers and horsemen and -women played a part in challenging these erroneous perceptions. As a consequence sporting success played a vital role in inspiring other Aboriginal people to challenge the stigma and stereotypes that they were expected to endure and carry. The sporting arena was not just a venue for sporting participation but, I will argue, was responsible for generating and exposing Aboriginal people to a range of far-reaching influences, not least political ideology.

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