Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Authors

Aimee Nygaard

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-17-2011

Journal

International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction

Volume

10

First Page

162

Last Page

173

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1007/s11469-011-9317-6

Abstract

This study explored a rural, First Nation understanding of factors, particularly the role of culture, supporting recovery maintenance from problem substance use. A cross- sectional, qualitative research design and community-based methodology were used. Participants included 20 members of a rural Canadian community self-identifying as recovering, or recovered, problem substance users, and those with professional experience with First Nations recovery. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews gathered in-depth accounts of the recovery experience examined through a thematic analysis. Culture emerged as a contested concept, and was viewed along a spectrum from detrimental, to somewhat helpful to very beneficial in the recovery process. Community change emerged as a key theme. Conclusions suggest that the tension in understandings of culture in this context inhibit potential social supports for recovery. However, whatever power culture may hold, socio-economic context is also a significant factor that must be addressed to support long term recovery.

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