Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Authors

Kjell Olsen

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2008

Journal

Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change

Volume

6

Issue

3

First Page

161

Last Page

184

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14766820802553152

Abstract

This study analyses how Maori operators in the tourist industry portray indigenous culture in their brochures. For close to 150 years, Maori people have been involved as entrepreneurs in New Zealand’s tourist industry. Although now integrated into the modern New Zealand nation-state, the representation of their culture in tourism gives an image of a traditional people radically different and set apart from modern New Zealand (Kiwi) culture. Utilising Fabian’s ideas regarding the organisation of otherness through cultural constructions of time and space, this article demonstrates how certain spatial arrangements are necessary to sustain the imaginary temporary division between a modern Kiwi culture and the representation of a traditional Maori culture, the latter is a tourist attraction in itself. Auto-ethnography in the dis- course of tourism inevitably becomes ‘self-Orientalism’, even if some spaces makes co-presence possible.

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