Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Authors

Ruth Nicholis

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2009

Journal

International Journal of Social Research Methodology

Volume

12

Issue

2

First Page

117

Last Page

126

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13645570902727698

Abstract

In response to the theories of empowerment and social justice, research involving Indigenous peoples often demands participatory and collaborative methodologies. Consequently, researchers need to engage with reflexive evaluation of collective and negotiated design, data collection and data analysis to consider inter-personal and collective dynamics during the research process. What this means for those attempting counter-colonial research is that we cannot rely on a singular application of reflexivity to situate knowledge. Additional political and relational layers of reflexivity are essential to critically evaluate empowerment and participation by working ‘the spaces between’ through reflection about collaboration. By exploring ‘relationality’ as a methodology, this paper discusses three layers of reflexivity (self-reflexivity, inter-personal reflexivity and collective reflexivity). This reflexive work entails resisting essentialist positions while also recognising difference within a collective. The result is the ability to see that the Self-Other hyphen both connects and distinguishes between us, in processes of collaborative counter-colonial research.

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