Anthropology Publications

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2019

Journal

Language and Communication

Volume

64

Issue

2019

First Page

91

Last Page

103

URL with Digital Object Identifier

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.11.002

Abstract

This article illuminates the social structures and relations that shape agency for members of two marginalized groups in Canada and examines how individuals respond differently to constraints on their power to name themselves and their children. Constraints on spelling, structure and choice of name are framed according to the particular positions of indigenous peoples and immigrants in relation to European settler society as either ‘original inhabitants’ or ‘recent arrivals’. These historically unequal power relations are manifest in intertwined ideologies of language, identity and nation, evident in ethnographic interviews, media reports and online commentary. Differential responses include resistance, endurance and assimilation.

Notes

Published version available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.11.002

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Citation of this paper:

Pennesi, Karen (2019) “Differential Responses to Constraints on Naming Agency among Indigenous Peoples and Immigrants in Canada.” Language and Communication 64: 91-103.

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