Start Date

28-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2011 8:30 PM

Description

Summary: Special tables from Statistics Canada microsimulation projections data 2006-2036 were used as data sources. The analysis found that the Non-Christian to Christian ratio will double between 2006 to 2031 (from 15 to 30 per 100) while the No religion to Religion ratio will remain stable at about 26 per100 by 2031. Non-Christian to Christian ratios will be equal or higher than 45 per 100 in cities such as Toronto, Abbotsford and Vancouver by 2031. No religion to Religion ratios will continue to be higher than average in most in British Columbia and other Western cities compared to others in the rest of Canada. To summarize findings latent class growth modeling and discriminant analysis were undertaken to classify cities in terms of prototypical patterns of growth and pinpoint characteristics of cities associated with these growth patterns. Overall, findings suggest that greater intra-Christian and intra-Non-Christian religious diversity will be seen across cities of various sizes and geographies and that they will coexist with the more secular pattern of the reporting No religion in the next two decades.


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Apr 28th, 6:00 PM Apr 28th, 8:30 PM

Religion Mix Growth in Canadian Cities: A Look at 2006-2031 Projections Data

Summary: Special tables from Statistics Canada microsimulation projections data 2006-2036 were used as data sources. The analysis found that the Non-Christian to Christian ratio will double between 2006 to 2031 (from 15 to 30 per 100) while the No religion to Religion ratio will remain stable at about 26 per100 by 2031. Non-Christian to Christian ratios will be equal or higher than 45 per 100 in cities such as Toronto, Abbotsford and Vancouver by 2031. No religion to Religion ratios will continue to be higher than average in most in British Columbia and other Western cities compared to others in the rest of Canada. To summarize findings latent class growth modeling and discriminant analysis were undertaken to classify cities in terms of prototypical patterns of growth and pinpoint characteristics of cities associated with these growth patterns. Overall, findings suggest that greater intra-Christian and intra-Non-Christian religious diversity will be seen across cities of various sizes and geographies and that they will coexist with the more secular pattern of the reporting No religion in the next two decades.