Session Type

Presentation

Room

PAB 148

Start Date

10-7-2013 2:00 PM

Keywords

learning task inventories, organic chemistry, self-assessment, metacognition, scaffolding

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

University students who are capable of more accurate self-monitoring and self-assessment usually outperform less accurate students. Instructional support is an important tool that can be provided for learners to help them to understand that they should self-monitor and self-assess as well as how they should do this. To assist students in an introductory organic chemistry course in developing or improving self-monitoring and self-assessment skills, we offered scaffolding support through nine Learning Task Inventories (LTIs), completed weekly throughout one term. A class of 289 students were randomly assigned to one of 5 conditions (1 control = C1, and 4 experimental = E2-E5). Each group experienced a set of LTI conditions that differed with respect to feedback received and cognitive load. Specifically, participants in C1 received the LTIs. Condition E2 received LTIs and a metacognitive prompt. Conditions E3-E5 completed a learning quiz with different types of feedback: E3 received no feedback, E4 received brief feedback (i.e. The correct answer is A), and E5 received full feedback explaining specific answers. Participants also completed an introductory survey gathering important demographic information and an end-of-term survey assessing student reactions to the LTIs. Consistent with expectations, preliminary data support improved learning gains for reported test scores (F(2.86) = 4.48 value, p < .02 ), such that students who received full feedback on their quizzes outperformed students who only completed the quiz. This presentation will present the results pertaining to student attitudes and the effects of treatment conditions on final exam grades.

Media Format

flash_audio


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Jul 10th, 2:00 PM

Learning Task Inventories (LTIs) in Introductory Organic Chemistry

PAB 148

University students who are capable of more accurate self-monitoring and self-assessment usually outperform less accurate students. Instructional support is an important tool that can be provided for learners to help them to understand that they should self-monitor and self-assess as well as how they should do this. To assist students in an introductory organic chemistry course in developing or improving self-monitoring and self-assessment skills, we offered scaffolding support through nine Learning Task Inventories (LTIs), completed weekly throughout one term. A class of 289 students were randomly assigned to one of 5 conditions (1 control = C1, and 4 experimental = E2-E5). Each group experienced a set of LTI conditions that differed with respect to feedback received and cognitive load. Specifically, participants in C1 received the LTIs. Condition E2 received LTIs and a metacognitive prompt. Conditions E3-E5 completed a learning quiz with different types of feedback: E3 received no feedback, E4 received brief feedback (i.e. The correct answer is A), and E5 received full feedback explaining specific answers. Participants also completed an introductory survey gathering important demographic information and an end-of-term survey assessing student reactions to the LTIs. Consistent with expectations, preliminary data support improved learning gains for reported test scores (F(2.86) = 4.48 value, p < .02 ), such that students who received full feedback on their quizzes outperformed students who only completed the quiz. This presentation will present the results pertaining to student attitudes and the effects of treatment conditions on final exam grades.